We just raised a $30M Series A: Read our story

Lucidchart OverviewUNIXBusinessApplication

Lucidchart is #1 ranked solution in top Visual Collaboration Platforms and #2 ranked solution in top Mind Mapping Software. IT Central Station users give Lucidchart an average rating of 8 out of 10. Lucidchart is most commonly compared to Lucidspark:Lucidchart vs Lucidspark. Lucidchart is popular among the midsize enterprise segment, accounting for 42% of users researching this solution on IT Central Station. The top industry researching this solution are professionals from a computer software company, accounting for 25% of all views.
What is Lucidchart?

Our online diagram application makes it easy to sketch and share professional flowchart diagrams.  From brainstorming to project management, we support all of your communication needs. 
That’s why millions of users choose Lucidchart.

Lucidchart Buyer's Guide

Download the Lucidchart Buyer's Guide including reviews and more. Updated: November 2021

Lucidchart Customers

Google, Salesforce, Adobe, Whirlpool, Uber, Wal Mart, Pearson, Twitch, Riot Games, Western Union, Trimble, Starbucks

Lucidchart Video

Pricing Advice

What users are saying about Lucidchart pricing:
  • "We signed up for the month-to-month and it charged us all at once for the whole year. I believe we signed up for the $7.99 one. I think that was the price."
  • "Pricing-wise, it is pretty fair. I don't really know what group pricing looks like, but right now, I pay $10 a month for my Lucid subscription. One thing I would say is that I do worry about my bosses being okay with paying $10 a month for every single employee because we would have around 20 people. It makes me a little nervous about whether they are going to pay $200 a month for people to be able to use this software. At the same time, from where I'm sitting, it's totally worth it. We save a thousand dollars from using this software. It's still a no-brainer."
  • "At €167 per user per year, the pricing is slightly higher than Visio, but it's worth it."

Lucidchart Reviews

Filter by:
Filter Reviews
Industry
Loading...
Filter Unavailable
Company Size
Loading...
Filter Unavailable
Job Level
Loading...
Filter Unavailable
Rating
Loading...
Filter Unavailable
Considered
Loading...
Filter Unavailable
Order by:
Loading...
  • Date
  • Highest Rating
  • Lowest Rating
  • Review Length
Search:
Showingreviews based on the current filters. Reset all filters
Joshua Thompson
Integrator at a media company with 11-50 employees
Real User
Top 20
Organizational charts help to visualize and understand team hierarchies and relationships

Pros and Cons

  • "The organizational charts for visualizing and understanding team hierarchies and relationships are the reason why we purchased the package that would allow me to do more with it. I tried to find all the cheap ways to do things but the ease of access and the already preset structure that Lucidchart had in place made it easier. Out of all the choices that I saw come across my desk, Lucidchart was the best and easiest choice."
  • "There were some things I wish were a little bit more user-friendly. For instance, when you're putting all the stuff onto a document or PDF, there's a set limit of width and height. It would have been very nice in certain situations to be able to drag people on the far edges and move them back up so that everything fits nicely onto the page."

What is our primary use case?

I used Lucidchart because I had to create an accountability chart. We use an operating system called EOS, which is Entrepreneurial Operating System and I was tasked with assigning a seat for every role that's necessary to run an organization properly. Starting at the very top with what's called our visionary, which is really the CEO, and then my seat, which is the COO and I'm the integrator. From there, I had to divide it into departments and department heads and then the different roles each person plays within each department.

How has it helped my organization?

When I got hired at my company a month ago, I immediately went to the accountability truck that they had created. They used an Excel spreadsheet and it was so confusing because they had so many different boxes and nothing was color-coordinated. From an outsider looking in with no background knowledge of the company, it took me literally four hours studying their Excel spreadsheet to understand who answers to who, what role, and what job responsibilities each job has. I had to scroll way down or way over to see everything. What I liked about Lucidchart was that from a top-down view, I could see the entire organization and who's involved in what roles on one page.

You can't print on Excel. Excel spreadsheets are not friendly when it comes to printing something like that. Lucidchart offered a better viewpoint. I'm going to put seven or eight hours into a chart and everybody else is going to glance at it one time. If it's confusing, it's going to make it even worse. The final product seemed a lot easier to understand from Lucidchart.

The ability for people to look at a diagram rather than reading through written documents saves time and as a result, money. Everybody's been asking for Slack, Lucidchart, and our information with our company to be all in one place. I think it's going to help with communication and future involvement.

So far Lucidchart has helped realize efficiencies in the projects we use it for. For the project I've used it for so far it's been easy to understand. I've shown it to a few people who have never used Lucidchart and have never really seen our organization's accountability chart put together in one spot. We had three different Excel spreadsheets that were doing the work of one Lucidchart. The few people I've shown it to have really liked what they've seen so far. If I can learn more about it, gain more knowledge, and even somehow get certified in something with Lucidchart, I think it's going to help the organization as a whole.

What is most valuable?

Whenever you create a new role with a new person, some of the presets were nice. You can have a photo of that person that was customizable. That was nice. It was pretty self-explanatory. I didn't have to create individual boxes, it was already preset. Some of the preset features are nice. 

Some of the presets were easy to use and it was a very helpful and speedy process trying to create a chart. But it is hard to create those kinds of charts in Excel, Word doc, or something like that. It's really not very user-friendly, it's very rigid. Lucidchart made it a lot easier on some of the presets.

When it comes to documenting things like processes, systems, and new teams, I would rate Lucidchart an eight out of ten. I don't think it's perfect, but I think it is one of the better choices out there available right now.

The organizational charts for visualizing and understanding team hierarchies and relationships are the reason why we purchased the package that would allow me to do more with it. I tried to find all the cheap ways to do things but the ease of access and the already preset structure that Lucidchart had in place made it easier. Out of all the choices that I saw come across my desk, Lucidchart was the best and easiest choice.

It is important that Lucidchart accommodates both Mac and PC users. At our company when you get hired you get the choice of using a Mac or a PC. It depends on each user. But it's very important that we're able to go across platforms and across Mac and PCs because every person in our company could have either/or, or both.

Lucidchart provides real-time collaboration among users so that everyone can access and work on the same version of a document. Right now, we're in the collaboration phase of the leadership team before we roll this out to the whole company. I found the share feature and I was able to put it in everybody's emails that needed to see the chart. I sent it to them on Friday. 

I think Lucidchart is going to be a great platform to help communicate to everybody and anybody moving forward what we are as a company, how we work, and who answers to who.

Slack integration would be vital to our work. We have our Gmail account, so we have email and all that kind of stuff. That's how I communicate with people. The editorial department communicates through Slack. As the company moves forward we're going to want to use a day-to-day announcements page and group creation. Having Lucidchart as a part of that is only going to enhance our users' experience with Slack, therefore enhancing the Lucidchart experience as well. It's vitally important moving forward that those two are integrated together.

What needs improvement?

There were some things I wish were a little bit more user-friendly. 

For instance, when you're putting all the stuff onto a document or PDF, there's a set limit of width and height. It would have been very nice in certain situations to be able to drag people on the far edges and move them back up so that everything fits nicely onto the page. Lucidchart seemed to have a preset distance left to right and up and down from each box and I couldn't adjust that. It made it very difficult when I was getting to the end and I had 30 people on one document and then I had to put our logo there and our core values because it was going out company-wide and I couldn't move some people around to fit onto a page. Lucidchart was just going to allow it to be off the page. I spent an hour and a half trying to drag things around, trying to adjust things, move things and combine things in order to get everything to fit on one page. It does have endless scroll but I have to be able to print this thing off onto one sheet of paper. It wasn't going to allow it to fit. I couldn't fit it to one page with everything fitting nicely because all the distances between boxes were predetermined. 

We need things to be printed out and pasted across the walls of our company. We're able to go beyond the borders on the digital side of it and it would be nice to have a feature that you could click just one button, like fit to page or something like that, and it would adjust everything to fit onto one PDF page. A feature like this would be helpful because I had to go to each individual box and adjust the height and width of every box. And I had to combine some roles into one role in order to get everything to fit.

If you looked at our chart, it's very wide because we didn't want people to think that this was necessarily a hierarchy chart. We wanted them to see that it's jobs across the board. The sales department would have six jobs going from left to right, not necessarily up and down. And so our chart became very wide and that's where I ran into issues. I couldn't drag things into open spots, which would make sense to our company because it seemed it was such a rigid structure that it wouldn't allow me to adjust or customize the space between boxes. 

It's a hierarchy, like an organizational chart. There are the people at the top and then the leadership team and the department heads. Then each department head has their own department and you have to have what each job is within that department. Some of the things that were very frustrating for me were that I couldn't adjust the distance between each box. If I had the department head above and then I created another role, it seemed like Lucidchart predetermined the distance. I couldn't shrink, extend, or drag without moving the entire thing all over the place.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been a teacher for the last five years. As a teacher, I used the free services as a teacher for my students. Recently, I have been using it for my new role at my new job. I am now hired at a multimedia company and I'm the operations officer. So we were creating an accountability chart. I've been using it for a month at my new company.

I'm using the Lucidchart platform. I go to the URL and log in.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I have not had any outages.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

It was pretty scalable. My only concern goes back to having it fit onto one page. It didn't. It seemed very rugged to try to get everything to fit on a page. It took me an hour to create the chart and it took me two hours to make it fit on the one page.

Every department head is responsible for organizing how their hierarchy is within their section. Having the ability to drag and drop people and update people, I think they're going to find it very useful because it's a live document. If people get hired and fired and we add and we grow, we can just simply add and drop boxes and stuff like that. They'll probably be using it on a month-to-month basis as we grow as a company.

I plan to use Lucidchart very heavily in the future because one of my core jobs is to implement our organizational flow across the whole company. Our company is going to grow. We're at 30 people right now and we plan to expand up to 100 in the next two years. My job is to stay hyper-organized in planning ahead. I definitely am going to be reusing Lucidchart many times moving forward.-

We have tons of projects. We are multimedia-based and we have seven newspapers. We have an online presence, websites, and stuff like that. We design websites and all that for other companies. As we develop this, I could easily see the sales department using it when we go to talk to clients, I could easily see the digital department using it for project management, and I could easily see the editorial department using it for project management as well.

I plan to expand to other users in the company. I would love to learn and incorporate. We have six people in the leadership team, including myself, and I want them all to have access to our charts and then be able to create their own charts and share and collaborate with each other so that the sales department and the digital tech department will both know who they need to talk to. Now that the company is paying to have Lucidchart and not doing the free version, I'll be using it heavily every month.

We do not require any staff for deployment or maintenance. 

How was the initial setup?

I clicked on the preset format of the hierarchy chart and then I went in and started adding the jobs, titles, and departments. From a user standpoint, it was very straightforward and easy to use. It just wasn't very customizable as far as spacing was concerned.

I was using the free version and I got up to 30 boxes. I had to upgrade to have more boxes. At first, I didn't do it because, being a teacher, to get anything bought was like an act of Congress. You had to go through a whole checklist of people and places and things to get something approved to be bought. In this case, I just went to my administration and said that it was a good chart and I needed more features. We bought the monthly package. So the process was very easy and straightforward. If you want the stuff, you only need to make a few clicks and you got approved.

What was our ROI?

For the people that have seen what I've created, they like it. Once they see how it can incorporate multiple users and we can all collaborate and it can help each organization, it can help with communication and efficiency throughout, and I think people will get on board. Our CEO is very high on the newest, latest, and greatest things that are going to save us time and money. There's definitely the possibility of moving forward that we would want to expand, grow, and incorporate even more.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

We signed up for the month-to-month and it charged us all at once for the whole year. I believe we signed up for the $7.99 one. I think that was the price. 

What other advice do I have?

From a teacher's standpoint for projects for my kids, we used the free version because I was at a low-income school. They always used Lucidcharts to create charts, whether it be a timeline or to show the military. I was a history teacher, so I would show the generals and the people leading out as the hierarchy. I've always used it for hierarchy purposes or timelines, from a teacher standpoint. From an executive leadership standpoint, I only used it for the organization chart that I created this past week. I didn't even know there were databases there.

My advice would be to go to YouTube first and look at how people use Lucidchart's organization. Explore through the website and frequently asked questions and get a better understanding before you start. Use the free version for about a week and then explore if you should purchase Lucidchart. I would definitely look for reviews, recommendations, and past people's experiences before pulling the trigger.

I definitely will explore some options as we have a need for them. This is a trial for the company and if everything goes as well as planned as far as implementing our organizational chart and looking at the other features it has, we will definitely start exploring how Lucidchart could help us.

A tip would be to just start off by using the pre-made charts and the pre-made formats, like I did, and allow time. I would set aside an hour a week to just play around Lucidchart and to click on all different features and all that kind of stuff. I didn't have that opportunity because I was pushed for time. But I definitely would explore Lucidchart through the free version and see what the paid-for version would give you in addition to what the free does and then just play around with it, make different charts and see what all they offer.

I would rate Lucidchart an eight out of ten.

Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Flag as inappropriate
SS
Marketing Director at a construction company with 11-50 employees
Real User
Top 20
Intuitive, designed in a way that it gives you what need, and saves time and money

Pros and Cons

  • "The ease of creating some of the maps and diagrams is most valuable. Lucidchart is just simpler and works more intuitively than other solutions that I have used in the past, such as Microsoft Visio. I am not in a creative role, but I know how to use Adobe Illustrator and other solutions like that. If I need to map out something that I've never mapped out before, and it is going to need a totally custom graphic, eight times out of 10, I'm going to go to Lucidchart rather than trying to build it in Illustrator. Its intuition and flexibility are really big features for me."
  • "I would really like to be able to set default appearance settings for new documents because I have a set of appearance settings that I always use. I end up setting that manually every time. There may be a way to do that, and maybe I am not able to find it. This is my only major point of feedback for improvement. There are other little nitpicky things, such as being able to lock layers without them looking like a big red line around them would be nice, but every graphic design software does that, so I understand why they have that. All my concerns are nitpicks. They're not big."

What is our primary use case?

There are a few different things. The main one, obviously, is creating business workflows. 

I've been using its web-based version.

How has it helped my organization?

It is excellent for documenting things such as processes, systems, etc. We have a guy who is a salaried commission salesperson who was doing very dry due diligence work on real estate deals. I took what he was doing and mapped it out so that a $12 an hour temp person can do it. It is very good for that. It is also good for mapping out things like marketing campaigns to explain to clients. I also run an agency on the side, so having here's what we're going to do and let me visualize it for you has been extremely useful as well.

It is important for us that Lucidchart accommodates both MAC and PC users. We have a mix at our current company, and I have guys who work from an iPad. We're currently in the process of transitioning everyone to MAC. It has been a headache because some of the software products that we can get on a Windows computer are not available for MAC. We're a construction company first and foremost, and a lot of construction software is designed around Windows. Lucid is a huge part of my day-to-day work. I use it almost every day. It is very helpful that it is web-based, and it accommodates both MAC and PC users. 

The ability for people to look at the diagram rather than reading through written documents has absolutely saved so much time, and as a result, money. For our due diligence process, I can't give a written manual to the kind of employee I have for this work and expect that employee to follow it. There's no way. Without Lucidchart, the whole project of having that employee do due diligence kind of dies because I don't have a way to show them that this is how to follow this workflow. If I'm paying somebody $12 an hour, I'm not going to expect them to be proficient at reading a technical manual. That would be a huge learning curve, but almost anyone can read a flow chart. I worked at fast food when I was 16, and I had flow charts on how to do stuff. You can give that to somebody who's very low-skilled and have them working above their skill level. It is a tool for employee growth in a way because you're able to give somebody a task that might be out of their pay grade and grow them into that role because you're able to explain it more simply.

It has definitely helped us in realizing efficiencies in our projects. Just yesterday, I was working on this due diligence project. We buy land, and when we get any land under contract, we have a period of time where we have to go and assess the land and decide if we want to buy it. It seems like you have to be an expert to do it, but it's really following a mental checklist. I got with my guy who does that, and I said, "I need you to tell me every question that you need to be answered in order to tell me if we can buy this land." He was like, "Well, this one, no." I was like, "No, you need to tell me every single question, and we'll get it on the chart." Doing that, I realized that sometimes, he's sending people out to look at stuff that he knows we can't build on. I was like, "They shouldn't be going out to look at that if you know that we can't build on it." That's an employee who is more highly paid than the person is who is going out to look at the land. That person is wasting two to three hours of their time to drive out and look at a lot that may not be buildable. That was just yesterday, and that's going to save us thousands of dollars. That's a huge time saving, which is time and money.

What is most valuable?

The ease of creating some of the maps and diagrams is most valuable. Lucidchart is just simpler and works more intuitively than other solutions that I have used in the past, such as Microsoft Visio. I am not in a creative role, but I know how to use Adobe Illustrator and other solutions like that. If I need to map out something that I've never mapped out before, and it is going to need a totally custom graphic, eight times out of 10, I'm going to go to Lucidchart rather than trying to build it in Illustrator. Its intuition and flexibility are really big features for me. 

It is very flexible. I use it for creating flow charts, processes, checklists, and if this/that or decision trees kind of things. I also use it for creating social media posts such as how to have a sales conversation with a prospective client. I like tools where you start from scratch. I know there are some great templates, but I don't really use those. I'm mostly using the start from the scratch feature, but I have used templates for things like customer journeys or to get inspiration for how complicated my campaigns should be. They have been useful situationally.

In terms of user-friendliness for someone who is more of a viewer, such as a client whom I just met or who isn't technical, I'm pretty confident about sending a Lucid link or even a PDF of the document to them. They're going to understand it. It is very well designed, which makes the UI elements of Lucidchart easy for people to understand.

What needs improvement?

I would really like to be able to set default appearance settings for new documents because I have a set of appearance settings that I always use. I end up setting that manually every time. There may be a way to do that, and maybe I am not able to find it. This is my only major point of feedback for improvement. There are other little nitpicky things, such as being able to lock layers without them looking like a big red line around them would be nice, but every graphic design software does that, so I understand why they have that. All my concerns are nitpicks. They're not big.

For how long have I used the solution?

Overall, I have been using this solution for two or three years. My user account is only three or four months old because I started with a new company.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I've never had an issue with it being down or unavailable. I've never had an issue where somebody was on a device and couldn't access it.

Performance-wise, I've never really had a problem. I can't even think of a time that it had slowed down, or I've had to refresh.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Extendability-wise, I don't know how many third-party plugins or additional integrations are there, so I can't speak about that too much. 

Scalability-wise, I could easily see a future where every one of our employees has a license and is using it. It would actually make our lives easier as opposed to more complicated. In that sense, I would say that it is super scalable.

Currently, I'm the only one using it as a creator or editor. Our land acquisition guy is also using it. He is just looking at it; he is not editing. Our two co-founders, our VP of operations, and our VP of construction are using it as viewers. All four people at the executive or VP level are using it. I'm a director, so I'm not quite at the VP level, and everyone else above me is using it, which is cool. We'll very soon be at a place where there are people under me who are using it. That's definitely going to happen soon, so I would say across all levels of our company, it will be used. We have maybe six people right now, but in the next couple of months, we'll be at a point where we have 10 to 15 more people using it. As we get up to that point, we would probably have more editors too.

How are customer service and technical support?

I don't think I've ever used their tech support. I haven't had a problem where I've needed it.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I have used Visio very recently. I basically told my boss, "We either have to buy a Visio subscription or a Lucid subscription. I'm buying a Lucid subscription because I don't want to work in Visio." We're on the 365 stack, and they like us to use as much of that as possible, but I was like, "No, I'm using Lucid." I didn't have to migrate anything over.

The ease of use is the main reason for using Lucidchart. I know that Visio and Lucidchart can do similar things. For my purposes, I wouldn't even touch some of the more advanced stuff that can be done in Visio, so it doesn't make sense to me to use something that's clunkier.

One of my complaints with Visio is that it gives you a thousand different tools, but most people need just five tools. Lucidchart is designed in a way that it gives you what need for a task, and if you need more, it tells you where to find it. It's very well organized and user-friendly, so that's great. With Visio, you have a box with no organizers, shelves, or anything in it, and everything is just thrown in there. You have to know where your stuff is to know how to use it. Lucidchart provides you a little shelf for workflows if you're doing a workflow. 

Another thing that I do for people is CRM object mapping, where I define the custom objects that we're going to have in a CRM and all the attributes of those objects, including other objects that an object can have in it. This would even be useful for object-oriented programmers, such as Java or C# programmers. They can also use it for such things. That's how flexible it is. I use the same tool that I use to do my workflows and process maps. It is intuitive to map out what an object has in it because it can have other objects. With Visio, I'd be spinning my wheels a lot more and looking for the right tools for that end product. Capability-wise, they are the same or very similar, but in terms of getting to that end product, it is going to be faster if I use Lucidchart.

How was the initial setup?

Its initial setup is very straightforward. It is just a matter of you basically going to the website, and it is right there. You don't even need to have used any graphic design software such as Visio. If you've used any document management tool, such as Microsoft Word, you can go into Lucid and set it up and use it very easily. It is so simple.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Pricing-wise, it is pretty fair. I don't really know what group pricing looks like, but right now, I pay $10 a month for my Lucid subscription. One thing I would say is that I do worry about my bosses being okay with paying $10 a month for every single employee because we would have around 20 people. It makes me a little nervous about whether they are going to pay $200 a month for people to be able to use this software. At the same time, from where I'm sitting, it's totally worth it. We save a thousand dollars from using this software. It's still a no-brainer.

What other advice do I have?

It is definitely for most businesses. I've worked in a couple of different industries in my professional career. I've been a teacher. I've been in construction. This is my second time in construction. I've also been in marketing for a marketing company. I've been a business owner, and it has always been useful, so I can't really think of an industry where you wouldn't benefit from using it.

I used to use it with Slack. We have Teams now, which I hate. I like Slack much better than Teams, and when I use Slack, I integrate it. I don't know if I ever used the direct integration, but we definitely used to bounce stuff back and forth in Lucid when we were using Slack as our communication platform. These two tools are pretty complementary. They're both SaaS products. I tend to prefer the SaaS experience to having to download something.

I am currently not using Lucidchart for real-time collaboration among users because generally, I'm the document owner. I have done that in the past with my business partner for agency work, but never with a team or with more than one other person. This is something that I would like to do in the future. I see that as a huge plus. I just haven't used it yet. When I used it with my business partner, the development process was much faster because he didn't have to tell me first what needs to be changed and then I would change. It was so much easier. That's what I'm dealing with now. I'm going to slowly roll it out and start giving some of my co-workers access to Lucidchart because if they have feedback on a document, they have to be over my shoulder telling me what to change, whereas I could be sending them the link, and they could be changing it themselves if they have the feedback. That's obviously more preferable to what we're doing now.

I have very briefly touched Lucidspark. I don't think I've created a complete document in Lucidspark. It's something that I would like to use more, especially as we get into using more of these tools for strategic planning as opposed to mapping existing processes or improving processes. Right now, Lucidchart does pretty much everything we need, and I'm even using Lucidchart for things where I might use Lucidspark. For example, for the object mapping solution, I should be using Lucidspark, but Lucidchart does what I need, and so I don't have to use Lucidspark. That's why I haven't felt the need to move over to Lucidspark.

I would rate Lucidchart a 10 out of 10.

Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Flag as inappropriate
Learn what your peers think about Lucidchart. Get advice and tips from experienced pros sharing their opinions. Updated: November 2021.
554,676 professionals have used our research since 2012.
SaifKhan2
Product Manager at Technogise
Real User
Enables us to remotely collaborate in real time and be more efficient, but the UI and UX need work

Pros and Cons

  • "Lucidchart is very visual in nature, and it is something that we do use extensively for stakeholder mapping, for example. If you want to build graphs for things like who the decision-makers are in a particular organization, Lucidchart can be used for that."
  • "There is a premium for the use of certain elements in Lucidchart... It becomes very annoying, especially if you are a first-time user of Lucidchart and you don't have a premium plan. It feels a little too restrictive, in terms of using very basic shapes and icons. It asks you to sign-up for the premium account, which I think shouldn't be the case."

What is our primary use case?

As a product manager, I often use these infinite canvases for coming up with ideas and  for brainstorming. I also use it for defining workflows of new products or features that we are brainstorming on.

Now that remote working has become so prominent, these types of tools come in handy when you are collaborating with a lot of folks and you need their input quickly, in a manner that is manageable. That is where I have used Lucidchart.

It's a SaaS-based service, through the browser. Things are automatically saved over the cloud.

How has it helped my organization?

We are a very visual organization. We are an Agile team and we practice XP (extreme programming). When we were on the floor in the office, we used to use whiteboards to create and visualize flows. The whiteboard was always stuck in front of the team's table so that we would know where we were up to as a team and the decisions that had been taken on that flow. When we all started working from home, in March 2020, those meetings became extensive and intense. That resulted in a little bit of Zoom fatigue. Being on a call for so long ends up with people tuning out. That is when we started looking at products with infinite canvases, and Lucidchart came in handy. It enabled us, once again, to work as a team. We could sketch out ideas and brainstorm on things collaboratively and comment on things in real time. We could see where and how things are moving in real time. It almost emulates the in-person meetings. Of course, it cannot replace the feeling of being on the same board, writing with felt markers. But it's a good enough replacement. 

The team could not operate without it. We were actually collaborating on Google Slides, which sort of worked. You can obviously edit a Google document in real-time, but it did not give us the same feeling of an infinite canvas, where the team could contribute and people could express their opinions on every step. I wouldn't say it improved the processes that we already had in place, pre-lockdown, but once we started working from home, it certainly aided us in doing something that we used to do. 

The solution also helped us be more efficient because we were using Google Slides. It's efficient in the sense that the information is percolated to everyone better. Everybody is on the same page and that is the most important thing when you are in the development stage of a project. Having everybody rowing in the same direction is very important. With Lucidchart, there is a document that everybody is able to look at and contribute to at the same time. It maintains the document well and in a very lucid manner so that the decisions are very clearly chalked out. That improves efficiency. Every member spends less time figuring out in which document decisions were taken or where that email is where they can get a sense of what the outcome was of a certain meeting. Instead of that, they can just look at Lucidchart and get the answers.

It saves time and money, at the end of the day.

What is most valuable?

The basic valuable feature is the infinite canvas, because that gives you the space to come up with anything. 

There are a few templates as well, for things like brainstorming or coming up with a mind map, although I haven't explored them much. I usually opt for a free-form canvas where I can build my flows from scratch and the team can collaborate at the same time.

Lucidchart is very visual in nature, and it is something that we do use extensively for stakeholder mapping, for example. If you want to build graphs for things like who the decision-makers are in a particular organization, Lucidchart can be used for that. It's a use case for which you might use a Google Doc or a Google Slide, but if you want to get everything on a single canvas, Lucidchart does come in handy.

We design flows and wireframes and models and we put in where the data would flow.  I have used Lucidchart to create the diagrams and flows of system architecture, and how the data would flow downstream and upstream. One thing that I really appreciate about Lucidchart, a standout feature, is that whenever you attach a Google Sheet link, to signify the data flows in a particular sheet, it actually captures a particular DB or Google Sheet with its link. If you double-tap on it, it redirects you to that particular sheet. I don't know if that feature is available in other products. I really like that in Lucidchart. It comes in handy if you don't want to have to bookmark that sheet separately. You can get it from within Lucidchart itself, which helps you to keep everything neatly in one place.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using Lucidchart for about two months.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I have had no issues with the stability. Everything is saved in real time and whenever I access it, what I have worked on is there. I have no complaints. It almost works with the reliability of Google Sheets and Google Docs. Google is the gold standard for real-time saving of edits. Lucidchart is pretty much the same in that respect.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I haven't really thought of Lucidchart in terms of scalability. From an enterprise perspective, if 1,000 or 2,000 people were collaborating on a particular canvas in Lucidchart, it would probably become a mess. It works well for smaller teams, perhaps a maximum of eight to 10 people. Beyond that, it's not really practically possible. Even in physical settings, we do not do whiteboarding with more than 10 people. If there are 20 or 30 people in a meeting, on a whiteboard, it becomes very messy. A small, nimble team, like an XP team or a scrum team, can use Lucidchart.

Whether we will expand our usage depends on how Lucidchart evolves as a product. If the product gains enough momentum and enough industry adoption, where more and more people end up using it, then everybody ends up using it. So it is dependent on the adoption of the product itself and is not necessarily something related to the product's features. If it provides better value through its pricing, people will start adopting it. That is the same curve that we saw with Google Suite. They provided immense value to organizations and now everybody is using Google Suite. There might be better products than Google Suite, but the adoption of Google Suite has spread. In the three organizations I have worked at during my career, I haven't seen any using Microsoft Outlook.

How are customer service and technical support?

I haven't used their technical support.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We tried using draw.io as a stop-gap solution, but that didn't work that well. While draw.io looks very similar to Lucidchart in terms of its UI, I don't think it has evolved much.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was done by our client's organization, so I wasn't involved. But because it is a cloud-based solution, I don't think there was any kind of deployment needed. I expect it is a plug-and-play solution that they paid for and we started using.

It doesn't really require any day-to-day maintenance because everything is stored in the cloud. It doesn't require any kind of configuration.

We have six or seven folks right who are using it. There are developers, people on the QA team, the product manager, and the engineering manager.

What was our ROI?

Right after the lockdown started, meetings were really long. That is when we felt the need to select something like Lucidchart. As a result, on average we have saved one and half hours per day in meeting time. That translates to value.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

I wasn't involved in the purchase of Lucidchart, but Lucidchart does the same things that other products do, like Miro and MURAL. The way I would make the decision is that if Lucidchart is cheaper than those products I would pick it. Maybe the UI is not the most modern, but it helps you achieve the same goals. If there is a major difference in price, I would definitely go with Lucidchart. Otherwise, I would take Miro or MURAL, because they are more modern looking and have better UIs.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

I do really appreciate that Lucidchart is actually on par with draw.io. That is a tool that I have been using for a very long time, and it is a free tool as well. Lucidchart can pretty much do what draw.io can do. It has been structured in a very similar manner. draw.io doesn't give you as many ready-made templates. Lucidchart can pretty much do what you ask of it, in terms of building workflows. draw.io is primarily used for creating architectural diagrams, to show how systems interact in a software program, for example.

But I feel that there is a premium for the use of certain elements in Lucidchart, like a drop-down. These features come at a premium and are only accessible in the premium plan. Most of draw.io's icons and clip art are free. It becomes very annoying, especially if you are a first-time user of Lucidchart and you don't have a premium plan. It feels a little too restrictive, in terms of using very basic shapes and icons. It asks you to sign-up for the premium account, which I think shouldn't be the case. I realize that companies need to make money, but first impressions are important. Without completely communicating the value of the product, people might switch to something else. After a while, my organization did take the premium account, so that problem was solved, at least for me. But this was one of my biggest gripes with Lucidchart in the beginning.

With the unpaid version of Lucidchart, where you can get a feel for the user experience, when you try to drag a premium icon into a chart, a pop-up says that you have to buy the premium account. There is a product called Canva. It's an online platform for designing. Something they do, which is really smart, is that they call out premium elements very clearly in the menus. If something is premium, you already know that you can't use it without a premium account, and that saves you time, instead of ending up with a premium element and seeing a pop-up. In Lucidchart, there's no clear demarcation that something is a premium element, unless you try to bring it into your chart. That is annoying at times.

I have been using a couple of other products, such as Miro, which is also an infinite canvas, as well as MURAL. What I have found is that Miro and MURAL certainly have better UIs compared to Lucidchart. Lucidchart emulates draw.io in terms of its UI. It's a little dated. A user will be able to find their way through Lucidchart and draw.io, but Miro and MURAL have a much more modern look.

Other than the visual aspects, Lucidchart can be used to achieve the same goals as the others when it comes to functionality. You can collaborate on the same canvas in real time and you can see other peoples' cursors.

What other advice do I have?

Collaboration is the key. For teams to move faster, they need to make decisions in real time and keep everybody in the loop. As a scrum team or an XP team, these are the things that we valued even before Lucidchart. But then, we needed something that would aid our discussions in the absence of a whiteboard.

My advice would be to visit product review sites, like IT Central Station, and see how the products in the category compare to each other. You might unearth certain features which are not very evident from a product website itself. Word of mouth is something that
will give you an unbiased opinion. It's actual users who can articulate the value proposition. If your own use case matches that of somebody who has already used it, read the reviews and evaluate it yourself.

Lucidchart is not seen as a tool that can be used for documentation purposes. It is primarily seen as a tool that can come in handy for things like brainstorming and when sketching out new processes. It is basically a replacement for a whiteboard, and the processes that we used to do at the office around that, such as collaboratively sketching. That is what it has replaced. It has not replaced Google Docs or other things that are primarily used for documentation.

We use Lucidchart's Slack integration, so if you share Lucidchart in Slack, it will automatically pop up if you want to share it with somebody who is on Slack. When you want to integrate Lucidchart with Slack, it asks for certain permissions. After that, if you want to share a particular file, it will start showing it to all the people who are on the Slack channel. Once you share that file for collaboration, it pops up on their Slack channel, and they can open it from there. That is a neat feature I would say. But if I had to use some other product that has better features than Lucidchart, but lacked this particular integration, I would be fine with it.

I would rate Lucidchart a seven out of 10. It achieves what it says in the value prop. But there is a lot of scope for improvement in making it easier and more modern in terms of the look and the experience for new users.

Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Flag as inappropriate
Nicolo Valsasina
Talent Acquisition Specialist at eDreams ODIGEO
Real User
Easy usability, great real-time collaboration capabilities, and works on both Mac and PC

Pros and Cons

  • "In general, the usability is great. You have a ton of customization options with different colors, different borders, different thicknesses of lines, different types of arrows, et cetera. There's so much variety. You can really make a chart with all sorts of color-coding, and color charts in different colors, link them together, for example, or use different types of arrows for different types of links between the chart elements. That variety, while not a specific feature, is really useful. If you want to make a chart, you can basically do anything."
  • "I've had an issue is when you create, let's say, a rectangle box. You can write some text in it and give it a name, and, depending on how you shape the size of the box, the text will rearrange itself to fit. That is, except if your box is very, very narrow, but very long, like a long, narrow rectangle in a vertical position. In this case, the text will always go out of the rectangle."

What is our primary use case?

I've used Lucidchart much more on a personal project than at work, just by coincidence. Mainly at work, we've used it to create a very simple diagram chart, some squares, some circles, and arrows connecting them. It's for HR purposes. I work in human resources. We basically map out the process that a candidate goes through when they're hired in the company. We made some squares saying all the steps that need to be done to onboard someone and we connected them with some arrows and made a flow chart.

On the other hand, I've actually used it very extensively for a personal project of mine, which is a video game. Since I'm developing a video game, I'm using Lucidcharts to organize all the different pieces of the game, including the levels, the maps, and how they all interact with each other. That's also basically a giant flow chart and diagram with loads of connecting pieces.

How has it helped my organization?

My company uses Lucidchart way more in the product, tech, and other departments that work directly on our product. Being in HR, we only use it for a few things, however, I know that they use it for all sorts of flows and processes in terms of tech development. They do have it integrated with Jira, and I'm sure that they make use of that integration as well.

What is most valuable?

In general, the usability is great. You have a ton of customization options with different colors, different borders, different thicknesses of lines, different types of arrows, et cetera. There's so much variety. You can really make a chart with all sorts of color-coding, and color charts in different colors, link them together, for example, or use different types of arrows for different types of links between the chart elements. That variety, while not a specific feature, is really useful. If you want to make a chart, you can basically do anything.

I've mainly used it as a chart. What I've appreciated the most is the variety of options. I use the different types of blocks that they offer as well. You can use a normal rectangle, however, you can also use a post-it block note that I use for different purposes, for example. With all that variety, you can really organize yourself however you want. That's the most powerful part of this tool for sure.

Lucidchart's capabilities for visualizing and understanding those flows and processes are absolutely excellent. I'm very happy with it. Even in a work setting, as soon as we actually used it and put these flows into a visual format, everything was much smoother. We started understanding everything much better. As a visual tool, I would say it is excellent.

There have been many efficiencies achieved using Lucidchart. For example, in the professional project, once we mapped out the flow, it allowed us to identify pain points. Seeing the flow so visually, when we moved from step A to step B we were able to pinpoint the exact pain points and when they happened during the flow.

It's important that Lucidchart accommodates both Mac and PC users as I do really use both, especially for the kinds of projects I'm working on. I usually use the Mac as the side of the screen with Lucidchart, and then I use the Windows big screen to work on the actual project. I don't know if it's common to be in my situation, however, for me, it's absolutely important that I can use the product on either operating system.

I have used Lucidchart to collaborate among users on the same version of a document in real-time. The flow that I have been working on, that we did for each chart, was done in real-time. It was great. Obviously, people need to be a little organized and not start moving things around altogether. We were well organized and it worked great. Everyone could see what everyone else was doing in real-time. It's really good. It works perfectly.

Real-time collaboration has saved us time. We were genuinely stuck until we did that, and it's something that completely unblocked our process. We didn't know how to proceed, due to the fact that pre-Lucidchart, everything was unclear. Nothing was really organized and nothing was visually presented. We were completely stuck. This product really allowed us to move forward.

It's a bit hard to assess how much time was saved. That said, considering we had about one meeting per week to work on this specific project and the first three or four weeks, we basically made zero progress. Then, on the week we started using Lucidchart, we made a lot of progress, and two weeks went by, and we already made way more progress than in the first four weeks. You could say it doubled our efficiency. 

What needs improvement?

Mostly, for what I use it for, it has absolutely everything I need. I use it for 99% visual presentation, as I'm working on a project that has 70 moving pieces. If I didn't put that into a visual format, I would be completely lost. That's really all I use it for and that functionality to me is absolutely perfect. In all the time I've used it, I've never been in a situation where I thought, "Oh, damn, I wish they had this feature." I really can't think of any time it's happened. That's why, for me, really, it has everything I need.

There is a tiny detail, however, that is a minor feature. Possibly the only time ever I've had an issue is when you create a rectangle box, for example, you can write some text in it and give it a name, and depending on how you shape the size of the box, the text will rearrange itself to fit. Except if your box is very, very narrow like a long, narrow rectangle in a vertical position. In this case, the text will always go out of the rectangle. It could be nice to just have the option to rotate the text, for example, 90 degrees so that the text fits perfectly in the vertical rectangle. That said, it's really a minimal feature and I wouldn't call it a pain point at all. It's really just a small detail.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using the solution for two months. 

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The product runs great. Even though my personal project with the charts is really big, it still loads very fast, and there's no lag. There are no delays. It never fails in saving or any of that.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I have to admit I've hit the maximum, however, for my personal project, it might be due to the fact that I'm using the free version. I did get a warning that told me that I reached the limit, the maximum number. Honestly, it is a decent number. It's around 300, and my chart is definitely very, very big. There is a limitation, however, for the free version.

At my company, there are different teams using the product, and I don't have visibility on everyone. The product team definitely uses it. The team that uses it the most is product owners and product designers, and anyone who's really working directly in how the product flow works would use it. For example, they would be mapping customer journeys through our products - how they enter into our platform and what they do, which steps could they follow for conversion, et cetera. All of that is very much done on Lucidchart, and that's the product team mostly. There are also some engineers, probably the more senior ones that intervene more in the actual product development steps. 

The big users and the ones who installed and set up Lucidchart and promoted it through the whole company are our agile coaches. We have a whole team of agile coaches due to the fact that our engineering team is 600 people. We are a very large organization with a very complex structure, and we have an entire team of 10 agile coaches whose role is to really help the engineering department run smoothly. They're really the biggest fans of Lucidchart and the first advocates of the product.

In the case of HR, we really only used it for that one very specific project, and we will never use it again. I really wouldn't say it's due to the product at all. It's simply due to the fact that we haven't really had any project that requires that as of now. That said, I would definitely be recommending it if we start a project that would really need some good visual representation. That would be my first recommendation to the team.

How are customer service and technical support?

I haven't contacted technical support, however, I'd tell them it's great. I would tell them how useful it was for me. Honestly, I'm a big fan. I would just tell them they've done a pretty good job, as it's a great product.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I'm really not familiar with any proper charting tools. I used PowerPoint and Microsoft Word until now. I've definitely not used specialized tools. Anything else would be considered very inconvenient to use for something like the tasks I've worked on compared to Lucidchart. It's not even comparable.

How was the initial setup?

On my personal project, the initial setup was super easy. I just logged in and I started using it. I have to say we had a little bit of difficulty when we used it with my company because for some people, when the person who created the chart started inviting us to the chart, we had a few difficulties in getting the permission and access we needed. That's probably related to the fact that we are using the company's Lucidchart account. Therefore, we had to get some special admin permissions. That said, it took us a little while to get everyone on it and authorized to start working on it.

To set everything up took a couple of days due to the fact that there were six of us working on a specific project. It was created by one person, and out of the six of us, three of us had some issues, as in, we received the invitation, we accepted it, and it redirected us, and yet we were sent to a blank board instead of the board we needed. What happened is the admin of our Lucidchart account either triggered permission or sent us a link, and we accessed it directly and we ended up being fine. It was nothing very problematic.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

I'm not the most expert or knowledgeable in terms of product prices and what companies usually consider expensive or not. If I base it, for example, on my knowledge of typical HR tools that charge you for user licenses, the team package for Lucidspark to get users collaborating together, I wouldn't say it's exactly cheap, however, it's within a reasonable amount. I've seen much more unreasonable products that really weren't worth their price. In comparison, it's relatively fair. I wouldn't say it's a great deal, however, it's definitely worth it if you make use of it.

There's the individual license, which is seven euros per month. That one is really targeted to non-professional users, or at least to people who use it individually. In my case, I wouldn't be willing to pay that, as I can do everything I want with the free version. Also, my buying power is slightly limited to be paying a monthly subscription for this. 

That said, for example, if I was working as a freelancer, working on projects like these every day, every week, I would definitely pay the monthly cost. Considering how much easier it can make your life, seven euros a month also seems quite acceptable. 

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

Considering how much I like Lucidchart, I'm really curious to look into the other products that are part of the Lucid suite. 

What other advice do I have?

I'm using the web-based version of the product.

I have not used Lucidchart's integrations with third-party solutions like Atlassian, Salesforce, Microsoft, or any others, however, I am aware this is a possibility. 

In our case, we haven't used the solution with Slack, however, I'm sure they do on the tech side, as we use Slack and it's integrated with everything we can integrate it with.

I would advise potential users to really make the most of it. For me, for example, being a very visual person, I really made the most of it in terms of using the color code. I have six different shapes of blocks to indicate different types of events. I have four different types of arrow connections to describe different types of connections. I have different types of post-its to use to leave notes. Make the most of it and don't be shy. Really go for it. Explore all the features and really make the most of it. That's the best advice I have.

For me, I'd rate the product at a ten out of ten. I've been super happy with it since I started. 

Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Flag as inappropriate
ZF
Continuous Improvement Manager at a consumer goods company with 501-1,000 employees
Real User
I get better and more productive engagement from team members and I get through mapping processes more quickly

Pros and Cons

  • "It is important that Lucidchart accommodates both Mac and PC users because if you support Mac, that means you also support the mobile applications on the iPad... Some of the other employees have access to an iPad, but not all of them do. When we're trying to talk through a process with them on-the-fly, or at the point of occurrence, it's so much nicer if we can both have it up on the iPad. That's why I would say the Mac support is essential."
  • "One of the things that I find frustrating is that all of our Tableau information is on a server, so when I send that out people can't open it and use it. I then have to go back and do extra work to convert everything into an Excel format that everybody can use. It would be really important to me, if I send something out to somebody who doesn't have a Lucid account, that they can just click and see it, instead of having to log in and create an account."

What is our primary use case?

We primarily use it for process improvement in a factory setting. What I am primarily using it for is making process flow diagrams—with the rectangles, circles, diamonds, arrows, and whatever else you would build into a process flow. 

We've had discussions about using it to build engineering-type stuff, as well. For example, "Here's the room, here are the dimensions. Here's what it would look like if we moved this piece of equipment, what space it would open up. Here are other constraints or barriers that it might create." We've had discussions on that, but we haven't really delved into that yet. 

I have the web-based for my laptop, and I have the app downloaded on my iPad Air. I've been using it on both of them.

How has it helped my organization?

We're primarily using it for process mapping and it's much quicker than trying to do it in Excel. 

Doing things digitally means that if I'm on a Teams or a Zoom meeting, I can get input from people and they can see it as we go. I'm a pretty big user of whiteboards. I have two in my office and those are great. But what I hate sometimes is when it comes to, "All right, let's take this away. Let's run with it," I have to take a picture and send it out. Then, at nine o'clock at night, someone on the team will say, "Oh, I just thought of this step that we completely overlooked..." I can't do anything about it because it's on my whiteboard. But using Lucidchart, I've been able to say, "Okay, I've got my iPad, let me add that in really quickly." I like the convenience and the user interface.

It is so great for understanding process flows or workflows. With the prior training that I had, doing things on whiteboards and in Excel or Word to manually build stuff was clunky. Because it was clunky, it was slow. When it's slow and you have a meeting, you lose people's attention. Because this is fast and not clunky, people are able to say, "Oh, okay. This is the next step and the next step." I get better engagement and I get through mapping the processes quicker. Because it has the different shapes and the explanations of what things mean, I'm able to get more out of it. Visually it is the best application that I've used.

I'm also getting productive engagement and productive challenge from my teams. Someone will say, "Well, that step shouldn't really be represented by a diamond. It's more a case that somebody has to go and get things and that causes a delay, but it's not necessarily a decision because it's built into the process." 

Per week, I probably do two of these exercises, and each one would take three-plus hours to get through when dealing with some of our more complicated processes. Now, we can get them done in about an hour. That's a huge improvement because of the software itself, but it has also helped us to see, "Wow, we have a lot of excess steps and waste in our process." For example, we were working on it with a team over the last two days and we got two new maps up in the span of an hour and a half or two hours. We're getting much quicker at process mapping and understanding what we need to address.

Lucidchart has also helped with training and developing standard operating procedures. Before, we would just use a piece of paper, and maybe it would have a picture of what is going on. And on that piece of paper would be a list of sequential steps. We still have to do that for FDA regulations of having and maintaining SOPs. But having printed out flowcharts benefits us because you can just flip over the piece of paper and see, "All right, here are the four or five little steps I take before I get to a decision, and here are the two branches from that decision." That extra context helps us in building a development tool. And we can post the process flow map for, say, operating a hopper, right on the equipment. That way, people can see things. And if they need more context or deeper instruction, they can bring up the actual SOP with all the words. But a quick little chart that shows the flow: "This is what I do. This is what I do if this fails, et cetera," is something that we're getting a lot of immediate benefit from.

What is most valuable?

It is important that Lucidchart accommodates both Mac and PC users because if you support Mac, that means you also support the mobile applications on the iPad. Because of the kind of factory setting we're in, all of the office personnel and management have laptops, but they also have iPads. Some of the other employees have access to an iPad, but not all of them do. When we're trying to talk through a process with them on-the-fly, or at the point of occurrence, it's so much nicer if we can both have it up on the iPad. That's why I would say the Mac support is essential.

It's easy to click and drag and automatically insert shapes. And once you have selected an arrow to move to a new location, it auto-associates the shape with it and you can right-click and change. There's no copy, paste, make next steps, start typing. It's all seamlessly integrated.

What needs improvement?

Integrations with third-party software are pretty important. I do a lot of work out of Tableau for data analysis. One of the things that I find frustrating is that all of our Tableau information is on a server, so when I send that out people can't open it and use it. I then have to go back and do extra work to convert everything into an Excel format that everybody can use. It would be really important to me, if I send something out to somebody who doesn't have a Lucid account, that they can just click and see it, instead of having to log in and create an account. I can understand if they can't edit it; that makes sense, to restrict that behind the paywall. But in terms of actually being able to open up the data, it would help. With Tableau, for our data management systems, it's a big constraint. The user interface across other software is very important to me.

Something that would also be nice—and maybe it's just a feature I haven't explored yet—would be to be able to link the data from other sources, whether Tableau, Microsoft Power BI, or even straight from Excel. That way, if we build processes we could immediately assign data, whether its defective units, operational uptime or operational downtime, changeover time, et cetera. It would help to be able to put it in there so that we can have the data collected and then somehow integrate it to each step of the process. For example, if this step of the process fails, it causes X minutes of operational downtime and Y number of defective units coming out of the machine. I understand that it might be a little advanced, but right now I'm taking the charts and correlating them to existing data from Tableau and from Excel. If there were a way to make it seamless, so I could click on my flow chart and show, "This decision point, this diamond, is potentially responsible for X number of minutes operational downtime, and Y number of defective bottles," that would be the continuous improvement dream.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using Lucidchart for close to a year.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I've only had one or two issues where the performance of it was delayed. I don't know if the cause was the internet connection or if it was because I was trying to fill out the charts on the iPad. But using the Apple Pencil, there were time delays between drawing lines between different process steps and getting things entered in. It was a little awkward on the timing. When you build something on the iPad, its performance might just not be as effective as building it on the computer.

Other than that, every time I build something there's no buffering or issues with it deleting my work or not saving things. It seems to be doing all the things that it needs to be doing. The iPad issue is the only little snafu I've had.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I can't speak too much abou its scalability. We could probably expand it and get multiple supervisors at my plant using it. But in terms of getting the information made and sharing it out, it's pretty quick and pretty easy. If we were to add a company server for it and 18 people working on it at the plant, I don't know if there would be scaling or server issues.

I hope we have plans to increase usage of Lucidchart. Our business is split up into four plants across the country. In the Continuous Improvement department there are four of us. We each have a license. There are plans to bring one more person onto the team. I'm hopeful that we would then be looking at getting it at least for our operations and production managers, which would potentially be an additional two licenses per site.

How are customer service and technical support?

I have not needed to use the technical support yet. I've not had any major issues.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Before Lucidchart, we were building process diagrams in Excel.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup of Lucidchart is a pretty straightforward process. There is still stuff I'm learning as I go, when it comes to knowing what to look for with different templates. But if the most basic function you need is to make process maps, and to do it quickly, and then figure out what you've got to improve, it's very effective at that.

What was our ROI?

While it's not directly saving money, because it is a paid-for service, it saves us money in the sense that we have a better understanding of our processes, what can be changed, and what we need to attack. We then go out and attack it, do it, update the maps, and then we get the return on the investment.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

I used Visio here and there when I worked for another company, but I was not the main user of that application. Still, between it and Lucidchart, I prefer Lucidchart. It is a lot simpler and a lot more accessible.

In my current company, we have not evaluated any other solutions. I think our engineers do have CAD for facility layout, but in terms of competitors to this, we have not looked at any directly.

What other advice do I have?

Watch some of the tutorials, check the reviews, and definitely talk to folks who are using it. Figure out what they like, what they don't like, and what they would want changed. There's a lot that I like about it. I find it to be a pretty good service. Get involved and play around with it, especially if you're working on facility layouts. I have printouts for some of the areas where we're implementing 5S and changing processes in. It's nice having something that the engineers have printed out, like a schematic or a blueprint for us.

Also, if you're going to try it out, try to make a simple process that you already know all the steps for; one you've already done it in Excel or in something else. See how much faster you can do it on this. That would be the big selling point. Trying to make some of these process maps in Excel, because it's so clunky and so slow, could take me 35 minutes just to get a 15-step process properly built, connected with the decision points in the lines, and for us to really understand where the pain points are. Taking something as simple as a 15-step process, timing out how long it takes to build it in Excel or PowerPoint, and then comparing it to this may show you, "Wow, with Lucidchart it took, maybe, five minutes."

I've been discussing getting this implemented in other departments at my facility.

In terms of its integrations, we've used it with some of the Microsoft suite for sending things out. I haven't used it for Slack yet, although I do use Slack for a nonprofit that I'm in. That actually might be a good opportunity because then I could just make some process maps for some of the nonprofit stuff that I do. And could then just send it out that way.

Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Flag as inappropriate
Bart Sajewski
Paid Search Lead Marketer at a wellness & fitness company with 51-200 employees
Real User
Helps us to realize efficiencies in the projects we use it for

Pros and Cons

  • "There is no alternative to Lucidchart if you want to describe a five-step process with bullet points. I believe every person who ever worked with PowerPoint on any type of documentation and then thought about which tool would actually help to describe what they're trying to do but without the words, would come up with Lucidchart."
  • "They should make it more user-friendly. The only option is either to use the existing template with already existing colors and gradients. If you want to do custom colors and gradients, then it's too complicated to use and should be simplified."

What is our primary use case?

I mostly use Lucidchart to describe projects, processes, process descriptions, and project flows. I also use it for mind mapping a little bit. I cannot imagine working on a presentation for my manager without using Lucidchart. It's handy. It enables me to clear my mind in terms of how the process should look, what the necessary steps are, what the flow should be, how the flow should look, and all the beautiful stuff.

How has it helped my organization?

Lucidchart definitely helps us to realize efficiencies in the projects we use it for.

There is no alternative to Lucidchart if you want to describe a five-step process with bullet points. I believe every person who ever worked with PowerPoint on any type of documentation and then thought about which tool would actually help to describe what they're trying to do but without the words, would come up with Lucidchart.

I discovered Lucidchart by accident. Someone in my previous company had used it before. I requested access, found it useful, and tried to learn how the tool works. I knew from the beginning, once I learned how to use it, it would be the tool I would want to use forever. It helps every time I need to squeeze a huge amount of information into something short and simple. The flows and diagrams help with exactly that.

What is most valuable?

Documenting things like processes and systems is pretty simple. I open up the blank diagram and start from scratch. In the beginning, it's more like mind mapping, meaning I just put on the screen what I want to achieve, what I have in mind, and then try to figure out what is missing. I consider what the best way to actually describe what I'm working on is, what the dependencies are so that the person I will be presenting it to later will understand what I'm working on. With words, it's all about the economy and time-saving. Lucidchart is a tool that allows me to squeeze a few slides into one slide.

I've been using Lucidchart for three to two years, at least, and I don't remember when the last time was that I was working on a presentation where there were no slides involved. I remember how difficult it was at the beginning. You have one or two slides reserved for you in a presentation for management, and you're trying to squeeze in as much information as possible. You can then play with the formatting. It's annoying that Google slides or PowerPoint don't simply allow you to do the same thing as Lucidchart does. 

Lucidchart is fully integrated with PowerPoint and other documentation tools I'm working with. I know that if I start with Lucidchart and spend some time there, there will be no problem with adding this to Confluence and to PowerPoint presentations.

The integrations are the most valuable features. 

I use templates as a reference, but even if I start with a template, I provide many notifications where the purpose of the template is different. I like the template because of the colors of those flows. The way the flow was presented was nice. It just looked better than anything I could do on my own.

It's important to us that Lucidchart accommodates both PC and Mac. In most cases, I work on a Mac, and the whole company works on the same devices, but there was a moment in time where I was on a PC and I was really happy with the fact that I didn't have to find another tool for the PC.

What needs improvement?

I'm not a designer. Most of the diagrams and flows I create are blank, black, and white. And sometimes I hate it but trying to work with different colors costs me too much time to figure out what color I should use and in what gradient I should use the color. That's the painful part. I would like my matches to do better. I'm trying to learn something from the templates in terms of appearance, but a grading tool, a tool that would allow me to choose between different gradients of the same color is currently unavailable. 

For example, on templates, I see a different set of colors being used, and I don't know which colors there are, which is why I use different templates sometimes. They offer better colors and look better. There's an option to ultimately change the color of your shapes using conditional formatting, but it looks very complicated. I would like to know more. I would like to know how to create those rules easily. At the end of the day, in the last step, I need to pick the color myself. I would like this tool to pick the colors for me.

They should make it more user-friendly. The only option is either to use the existing template with already existing colors and gradients. If you want to do custom colors and gradients, then it's too complicated to use and should be simplified.

If I would like to use the color green for any reason, the tool currently offers three gradients of green. There should be two fewer. It's the same for every other color.

I actually provided this feedback once directly in a survey to them some time ago. The current audience, I understand, based on the templates in Lucidchart, is tech people. I'm a marketer. I have slightly different needs. I want the stuff to look better and have better clarity. I don't need to know how to use a template for Amazon services and how to set up a server or whatever. The set of icons look impressive but are absolutely useless for a marketer.

It would be nice to have something role-based. They should target more people like me, mid-management, people who we need to present a lot, create a lot of documentation, pitch products to other people, explain what the necessary steps are. And I believe this tool is perfect for that. It could also be much simpler than it is right now.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using Lucidchart for at least two years but I joined my current company two months ago. I discovered Lucidchart before, in my previous company at least two years ago.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It's absolutely stable. I never had any problems with it. I like the fact that sometimes I close the tab or close the whole window and there would be something I didn't save or forgot to save. I reopen the tool, and my stuff is always there, up to date. I love it.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I tried using Visio but my experience was horrible. I also used a free solution from GitHub, a mind mapping tool from GitHub. I remember the appreciation for Lucidchart really increased the moment I realized how different it is to combine two shapes. 

I saved a project but then I couldn't access it for some reason. I lost it and had to start from scratch. The customer support said, "It's a free tool, what do we expect?"

I didn't have any expectations from the tools I was using. I just needed an hour with an online tool for free. But then I didn't know that Lucidchart had a free option, so I didn't turn where I needed to go. I didn't use Lucidchart and it was a mistake.

How was the initial setup?

In my first week, there was a presentation. A manager shared his deck with a Lucidchart diagram in it. I immediately recognized the tool and thought that it was great that my new company uses Lucidchart and I didn't have to request it. I tried to open a new account for myself because it was free, and then I saw the presentation and realized that the company uses a paid version, so my account was upgraded immediately.

The CEO and his team use it. I have no idea who else is using it unless I see a chart in a presentation, and this is also why we're not working on this together. When I see the button "Share" it means to me that I'm sharing this tool with other tools, not a person.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

I forgot how much it costs but if the tech team were to ask if we really needed it and they tried to dump the tool, I would definitely refuse, because I really like it.

This is the one tool I want to use. I don't care how much it costs. It's the best tool for the stuff I'm working on. It fulfills my needs, and for this sake, it can cost 10 times more. I don't care.

What other advice do I have?

We have a different tool for collaboration with our colleagues. If I create a business case and I need some feedback from the data team, I present the flow as I imagined it should look, and then I let the data person or the specialist tell me how to improve it, what needs to be different, and what needs to be changed. But I never thought about allowing anyone to have access to Lucidchart, simply because most of the people, especially the marketers, do not know about Lucidchart.

The transition into using it as a collaboration tool will not happen instantly. I remember there was a period of time when I was simply struggling with how to use the tool, and it took a while until I was capable of presenting my thoughts in an efficient way. And it would be hard to imagine that. For the sake of using the tool, I would have to do a workshop with other colleagues to explain how things work.

We do not use Lucidchart to compare versions of documents. We use Spark for that simply by sending the link to the presentation. I can integrate Lucidchart into presentations or another form of documentation, like on Confluence, but we rarely work on Lucidchart itself. It's just a tool for me where I need to accomplish something and then move it forward, copy and paste it somewhere else. It's not very interactive.

We just saw a presentation someone created and it had 30 different slides. I would just say in one sentence that this presentation could say even more with fewer slides if the person would use Lucidchart instead. PowerPoint or Google slides are not perfect tools. They're just carriers. The content you provide to those slides should be created somewhere else in a more professional way, and Lucidchart is the tool everyone should at least consider using because it speeds up the work. 

Sometimes I use Lucidchart just for myself, to mind map everything I have in my mind to see what exactly is there and how to make it simple. With Lucidchart, you just do step one, step two, step three, done.

I would rate it a nine out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Public Cloud
Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Flag as inappropriate
Mark N Sawczuk
Informatics Data Scientist at Abbott
Real User
Top 20
Enables us to better visualize our engineering processes and architectures within our Atlassian tools but caused us to lose diagrams

Pros and Cons

  • "The ability for Lucidchart to create database schemas or modify existing data structures is strong. That's what I initially introduced it for in our organization. The script that Lucidchart provides works with other systems like Oracle, SQL Server, and Postgres that I can copy-paste, and get a quick dump of metadata and import into has saved me a ton of steps that I didn't have to manually create these tables. I had a lot of things where I still had to put in the linkages between tables, but I didn't have to type in every field name, every data type, and everything else that came in. That saved me tons of time."
  • "Lucidchart subset their older components or something like that had happened. I don't entirely know the totality of it, but we were forced to upgrade to a different integration with Lucid than what we had. I've had a lot of frustrations with that because I've lost a lot of diagrams. I can't get them back and I'm getting pop-ups that are showing me that our data will be loading and I can't run four or five years of my engineering diagrams"

What is our primary use case?

I was previously using whatever was on the web, but we have a plugin for our Atlassian tools, like Confluence, where we can integrate Lucidchart diagrams into our Atlassian tools as well. 

Previously, I was using my own personal cloud subscription, but then I stopped doing that. Once we had integrated it into our Atlassian suite, there was a plugin for Lucidchart and we had licensed the plugin. And so we would use the plugin that when we would add that type of graph, it would take us to the external website for configuring our diagrams, and then we could exit back and it would render the diagram in our Atlassian solution.

Lucidchart subset their older components or something like that had happened. I don't entirely know the totality of it, but we were forced to upgrade to a different integration with Lucid than what we had. I've had a lot of frustrations with that because I've lost a lot of diagrams. I can't get them back and I'm getting pop-ups that are showing me that our data will be loading and I can't run four or five years of my engineering diagrams. I'm extremely angry about that. I can say that all the time I've had this thing is making me leery to using the plugin, let alone rather just use the tool independently and copy-paste pictures because when the plugin fails to work and you don't have an image to fall back on, you could lose years of work.

I have that as a real big sore point and I can't figure out what, why, or how, and there's not really a good clear point of context to figure out how I address recovering all the lost work I have or how to migrate it.

I had massive engineering, ERD diagrams, database diagrams, architectural diagrams, you name it for years. And a lot of the documentation I had in Confluence, including system architecture documents for our products. I can't get those assets back.

My primary use case was for data entity-relationship diagrams for UML. It shows the engineering, architecture documents, using UML and the general flowcharts, and swim lanes for process swim lanes. I do tons of processes and swim lanes. I'd say those are really the four things I usually do with it.

How has it helped my organization?

It's filling a gap where we can better visualize our engineering processes and architectures within our Atlassian tools.

It provides real-time collaboration among users so that everyone is accessing and working on the same version of a document. Although we rarely use it in that way. Unlike sharing a spreadsheet that is being filled in by multiple people or something like that, usually editing diagrams isn't something we're doing at the same time.

It hasn't affected our project development process. For other tools, having simultaneous collaborative access is great, but for diagramming, it wasn't really a necessity for us. And I think that is mostly because we access Lucidcharts through a plugin, through Confluence, as opposed to logging into Lucid and then using that as a primary tool.

The ability for people to look at a diagram rather than reading through documents has saved time. They can look at a diagram to better understand something as opposed to reading words. That's kind of an abstract idea. I can't put up a price tag on it. There are probably tens of hours saved on managing the ERD diagrams and specifics since the automation is there for that.

It helped us to realize efficiencies in our projects.

What is most valuable?

I was the one within our company that advocated bringing in Lucidchart five or six years ago, compared to other things like ERD diagramming tools. I found that we were reverse engineering and recreating a lot of database diagrams that were not being maintained with other systems and Lucidcharts. Actually, their import tools for that is what made it a lot easier to bring back some visibility in terms of large data warehouses and things that were going undocumented for far too long.

Its ability to document things such as processes, systems, and new teams is great. It's a very strong diagramming tool. I think it's better than Visio and other tools that I had previously used.

The ability for Lucidchart to create database schemas or modify existing data structures is strong. That's what I initially introduced it for in our organization. The script that Lucidchart provides works with other systems like Oracle, SQL Server, and Postgres that I can copy-paste, and get a quick dump of metadata and import into has saved me a ton of steps that I didn't have to manually create these tables. I had a lot of things where I still had to put in the linkages between tables, but I didn't have to type in every field name, every data type, and everything else that came in. That saved me tons of time.

I like the integration with Atlassian because Atlassian lacked strong modeling and diagramming tools. It didn't really have anything good for that. This solved that problem. That was really it since Atlassian tools are our one-stop-shop for managing our whole software development lifecycle, but it lacked good diagramming tools. This was a good solution for that, short of my frustration recently after the conversion of losing all my content, which I still want to get solved, but otherwise, it is filling that gap.

It's important to us that Lucidchart accommodates both PC and Mac because our company is split. 

What needs improvement?

The improvement we would like has to do with what happens either in a license not being renewed, or if you have an end-of-life scenario where the plugin was used and you're not going to support it, or the customer is going to stop using it. What happens with the data on the diagrams that was there previously? I feel like there should be something in the way that plugins are managed that if other customers have a third-party tool, if there's a cached version of an image or something it should make sure that the content is never lost. Once you've used that you shouldn't have to be bound forever to maintaining that relationship or have that problem that I have where the plugin was a subset, they did something else and now I've lost years' worth of work.

At a bare minimum, there should be some kind of fixed backup image on my server with the use of the plugin that would have been the better thing to do from the customer's perspective. I don't know if that makes sense, because this way it goes away, they don't want to support it. They want to change something. What happens to years of my work? And whatever else that I have. At a bare minimum, they should let me retain a PNG file or something of the diagram that I had. I would even have something to reference if I had to recreate it.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using Lucidchart for six to seven years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

I think it's pretty stable. It's never crashed on me.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I haven't had any scalability issues, even very large diagrams. I've never had any issues with that.

There are between 20 to 30 users that are mostly a mix of the engineering team, architects, and senior engineers.

The maintenance requires less than one part-time person. 

It meets our needs. We don't really have a reason to change it. We were forced to update the plugin to a different license type recently. We're still working through that, but it's still our preferred tool for diagramming at the moment.

How are customer service and technical support?

I never used technical support. 

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I used Visio before and I switched to Lucidchart. I was not really a fan of Visio, mostly from the perspective that the ERD diagrams were harder and Lucidchart was just easier.

The migration from Visio to Lucidchart was easy. 

I think they're both about the same or similar when it comes to intuitiveness and ease of use. I haven't used Visio in around five years. It could be totally different at this point.

How was the initial setup?

I think the setup was done within a sprint or two, they had it working and figured out way back when, but that was a long time ago.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

It is very economical for what it is. Nobody had an issue with the pricing of it.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

I did not evaluate other solutions. This was just a tool that was used at a previous company that I picked up and we were using it for this and I really liked it. It just kind of happened organically. And then I brought knowledge of that here when I was faced with a similar task in this role when I started here five or six years ago.

The only other tool that I use a little bit is Excalidraw, which is a free online drawing tool. I'm using that more now because I got burned by losing a lot of things with Lucidchart, with the plugin transfer. And so I'm finding now I'm starting to use other tools for a general diagram that I can copy-paste in a diagram of. I got burned with the lack of support and the plugin and losing years of drawing. And so now I'm making a concerted effort to integrate PNGs, as opposed to using the plugin as a container. That's pulling the content from the third-party server that I don't know what's going to happen with that relationship. I'm just going to use it as an external tool, copy-paste, and take screenshots going forward.

What other advice do I have?

My advice would be to be careful with the plugins, as far as if you're using this plugin as a means to bring in diagrams into something else, understand what the long-term implication is. If you decide to change or not, it's a great tool.

Copy-paste your diagrams, copy-paste pictures, or export picture PNGs of your diagrams to paste into other tools so you don't rely on the plugin perpetually working.

I would have rated Lucidchart a ten out of ten but after my recent experience with them, it's now a seven.

Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Flag as inappropriate
Sridhar Poornachandran
Head of IT Infrastructure & Operations at Aliaxis
Real User
Good brainstorming features, facilitates collaboration, and keeps us focused on our work

Pros and Cons

  • "The interface is easy for a layperson to use and adapt to."
  • "There is a basic function that I struggle with, in the interface, which is having to switch between the editing and navigation modes. A lot of clicks are required when switching between edit and navigation modes and I think that many could potentially be avoided by handling the tasks at the same time."

What is our primary use case?

I am the regional infrastructure manager, heading the entire IT infrastructure for my company. We are headquartered in Belgium and I work with a subsidiary in India, where we have 23 locations. My job includes taking care of all of the infrastructure-related activities. These are operational and project-related activities pertaining to network security and cloud-based solutions.

I use LucidChart as a brainstorming tool. It helps to ideate the organizational structure and anything to do with workflows and architecture. For example, when something new comes up, I turn to the platform to help with brainstorming and ideation, and it has helped to a great extent.

We use it as a mind map tool, for decision-making workflows, and technical workflows. There are multiple reasons that we utilize it, depending on the use case.

How has it helped my organization?

I also use LucidSpark, which is another tool that helps with brainstorming. Particularly in my role as an infrastructure manager for the region, I need to work on strategies. There are always a number of challenges, particularly during the transformation stage. I'm required to bring in the right products and the right skills. When I am stuck and face a blank, LucidSpark helps me to move forward.

The functionality for documenting things like processes is excellent. The templates are already available and all you need to do is bring one in and use it. This saves a lot of time and effort in terms of documentation, and you can export it to any format you need. It allows us to give our reports a professional touch.

I have used LucidChart to create a database schema for one of my colleagues. It supports the notations that we use, such as one-to-many, many-to-many, and others. There is support for components such as private keys, foreign keys, and other such definitions. It is something that is easy to do.

In terms of integrations, we use Microsoft teams as our platform for communication and I was able to successfully integrate it with LucidChart. The one limitation with teams is that people have to be comfortable with viewing things on a web browser.

Using this product brings up the wow factor when I present my ideas. I don't have to rely on PowerPoint presentations, which is another skill. The graphical representation also makes it more open to peer contribution and focusing on a problem.

This product has improved our collaboration and we now do it in a much better way. However, we do not yet have several people collaborating on the same version of a document at the same time. For example, earlier today I was working on a project with infrastructure managers from several regions. We were all on a call and I presented my thought process and ideas. I was the only contributor and I shared my screen. Although I was getting opinions from people, I was doing all of the work on the board. Ideally, people would treat it like a working session and do things like putting sticky notes on the board. In the future, having this type of collaboration would be great.

The plan is to let people know that the option for this type of collaboration is available, and have people come forward to contribute. This way, we start thinking and doing transformation on a different scale.

I can see that using LucidChart is going to save us time in project development, collaboration, and brainstorming. I can't estimate exactly how much it will save us without first having a baseline, although I can say that without the tool, ideation would take me approximately five times longer. The time it takes to complete a project has been drastically reduced.

What is most valuable?

The interface is easy for a layperson to use and adapt to.

There are a lot of pre-existing templates available to assist with a variety of methodologies.

Several different charts are available that include A3, fishbone, and others. There are also a lot of good techniques embedded, such as cyborg, lean, and agile. This helps us to set up the platform and choose which template to use, based on the problem statement.

This product is very adaptive and bringing it in has saved us a lot of time. Once we started using it, the thought process improved.

One of the best features is being able to share work product and opinion with my peers or take it to my CIO. There are good options and it shows how good our tools are at helping with brainstorming and ideating the thought process.  

What needs improvement?

There is a basic function that I struggle with, in the interface, which is having to switch between the editing and navigation modes. A lot of clicks are required when switching between edit and navigation modes and I think that many could potentially be avoided by handling the tasks at the same time.

For example, when I want to edit something or place an object then I have to click on the arrow. If instead, I need to zoom in, zoom out, or navigate to another area, I have to click the hand button, which will be replaced with a mouse cursor. If there was a feature to cut down on the number of clicks then it would be helpful.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using LucidChart for approximately one month. I have been delegated the responsibility of evaluating the effectiveness of the tool in my region.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

This is absolutely a stable solution. I haven't seen any glitches and in my experience, it is good.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We have a global moderator, who is a system architect. This person distributes responsibilities to the regional level, such as North America and Latin America. EMEA and India are also regions, and I am responsible for India.

At this moment, it is a little early to talk about scalability because, for the part of our organization in India, I'm the first person using it. We will expand in the next two years and we will be doing a lot of activities. This includes transformational activities and we need to bring some brilliant brains together. When we do that, this tool will be a great help in terms of facilitating collaboration.

When we get to this point, we will definitely seek the help of Lucid experts.

How are customer service and technical support?

A gentleman from customer support has reached out to me but unfortunately, my calendar has been booked and I haven't had the time to speak with them. As such, I have not yet spoken with anybody from Lucid support.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

If I want to reorganize my unit, there are multiple platforms that I can work with. I can use draw.io, Visio, or Miro, but adopting LucidChart was better from a strategic perspective.

At this time, it is my responsibility to evaluate the effectiveness of the tool in my region. I'll be in a position to evangelize the product across the whole organization, based on the key outcomes and whether the success criteria have been met. After I demonstrate its worth, the whole organization will adopt these tools.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is pretty straightforward.

For a layperson, it is quite interactive and quite helpful. From my experience, it was smooth.

What was our ROI?

We have seen ROI in terms of time savings, which naturally helps in terms of costs.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

At €167 per user per year, the pricing is slightly higher than Visio, but it's worth it.
First, it is just a little bit higher than Microsoft Visio. Second, there are a lot of additional features.

Lucid is a single platform but they have two products, LucidChart and LucidSpark. These go hand-in-hand and it would benefit many users if these two products were combined into a single, cost-effective license. I think that by combining these two products, Lucid can be very competitive and it would be a great value add.

One of the things that I do not yet know is whether anonymous users need a license in order to contribute. For example, if I have a license and I bring in some anonymous participants to interact with the board, I don't know whether the license covers them to do so, or if it is more limited than that. In other words, I am unclear as to whether a single license extends to multiple users.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

Prior to selecting LucidChart, we were assessing multiple tools. Miro was one of the contenders, as was Lucid. I worked with Miro in between periods where I was using Lucid.

When exploring the various options, I found that Lucid offered a lot of existing templates. These helped me a lot with brainstorming.

A more complete evaluation was done by our global team. That said, I don't foresee any disadvantages in using it.

What other advice do I have?

We are trying to bring in Jira for project management, and if that happens then I plan to integrate it with LucidChart.

There are no Mac users in my organization so it is not very important to us that LucidChart accommodates both Mac and PC users.

My intention is to be an ambassador within the organization and promote Lucid to multiple people who are in need. We need to have this solution used regularly by the team, although the first thing to do is identify the people who need it. I've been liaising with multiple people to understand how it would assist, and how we can make the best use of the tool.

Once we have a large enough audience, we will contact Lucid for help on improving the effectiveness of the tool. They may suggest certain things that can be done. In the meantime, however, I am passionate about using the platform and will continue to explore it on my own.

Overall, this is a good solution and for a layperson, it will be very easy to get started with and adapt to using.

I would rate this solution a ten out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Public Cloud
Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Flag as inappropriate