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Netsurion EventTracker Competitors and Alternatives

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Read reviews of Netsurion EventTracker competitors and alternatives

JY
Sr. Information Technology Security Engineer at a university with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Top 10
Provides a good structure to review logs and is easy to use. However, unless you are using SSDs, the Elasticsearch does not work well.

Pros and Cons

  • "If I were to look at logs manually, there's no way I could do that. As an example, they are 48 million logs processed a day. There is no way I could look at all 48 million of those. So, it gives me a good structure to be able to look at the different incidents which are created and do different searches."
  • "The solution's dashboard is okay. The one thing that we ran into are issues when we upgraded to the newer version. It uses Elasticsearch for the different dashboard entries. So, we were running on spinning disks, and Elasticsearch didn't work that well. A number of the different dashboards, like my dashboard or different things like that, pull from Elasticsearch. Since Elasticsearch really wasn't working, we were having some issues with that, but we just migrated."

What is our primary use case?

We are using it to centralize all of our logs and have alerting on security issues. 

We primarily import Windows systems and Windows Server logs (2012 and 2016). We also import Cisco ASA logs, then Cisco router and switch logs. The import works well. 

How has it helped my organization?

We send the Snort IDS alerts to EventTracker, e.g., high level ones like Ransomware and data leak type alerts, we are sending the Snort alerts to EventTracker. For things like ransomware, data leaks, and data exfiltration, we have higher incident reports created, so then it also gets sent to our email and phone. As an example, this Saturday night around four o'clock, we were alerted to an incident from EventTracker. They got a Snort alert about a data leakage or data exfiltration. It was a false positive, and that is good. But, this is just one way we use EventTracker.

What is most valuable?

It is fairly easy to use. I am mainly just a one man shop. I look at EventTracker about once a day as far as different incidents and stuff goes. I don't have enough time to be tweaking all types of different things. It is a fairly easy to use as far as the UI goes.

If I were to look at logs manually, there's no way I could do that. As an example, they are 48 million logs processed a day. There is no way I could look at all 48 million of those. So, it gives me a good structure to be able to look at the different incidents which are created and do different searches.

What needs improvement?

The solution's dashboard is okay. The one thing that we ran into are issues when we upgraded to the newer version. It uses Elasticsearch for the different dashboard entries. So, we were running on spinning disks, and Elasticsearch didn't work that well. A number of the different dashboards, like my dashboard or different things like that, pull from Elasticsearch. Since Elasticsearch really wasn't working, we were having some issues with that, but we just migrated. We just got a new fan, which is all-flash. Last week, the server was migrated from spinning disks to the new flash. Now, we have moved from hard drives to SSDs, and Elasticsearch is working a lot faster.

EventTracker's UI is okay. There are some issues that I have ran into. Some stuff doesn't display on different browsers, which you think would. You think you are missing something, and you actually are. If you use a different browser at work, it works differently. That is sort of frustrating. The big thing is they have a newer version or something out other than a new update to version 9. I don't know if they're on version 9.1 or 10 (or whatever). We weren't going to update until we could try to get the Elasticsearch capability (which we now have) and migrate over to the new SAN thing. 

There are a couple things that we had to tweak. One of the other things is we are getting DNS and DHCP logs from servers, which we thought required a different Microsoft hotfix, but it didn't. EventTracker's documentation wasn't current. So, it took a little while to get the DNS and DHCP logging figured out. Once we finally got it figured out, we got those set.

The searching capability has room for improvement. I know they are working on it. They have Microsoft SQL, then Elasticsearch, and it's hard to determine when I am searching what exactly it's searching through, as there is the Elasticsearch archive thing, RAID and the Microsoft SQL searching, and some like cache search things. So, there are about three different searches, and sometimes it takes a bit of trial and error to figure out what information I am actually getting.

Users need to be on SSDs in order for Elasticsearch to work well.

For how long have I used the solution?

We have been using EventTracker for about five or six years now.

I use it on a desktop machine with a wide screen, like 20-inch monitor.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It's okay for what it does. They're trying to add more different capabilities. One thing that I will be interested in, when and if we upgrade to a new version, would be the different types of alerts offered. They do have some different type of prebuilt alerts. The big thing is it's hard to know what things EventTracker may not be alerting on. They do have the behavior correlation part, but when I looked at that, it was using Elasticsearch. Since our Elasticsearch wasn't working that well, this was sort of problematic as there are a bunch of different false positives and stuff.

We sort of knew there would be issues when we did the upgrade because of Elasticsearch and our spinning disks. The searching isn't as easy as it could be, as far as the three different search things that you can do. 

This is same with the different dashboards, as related to Elasticsearch. If we were to implement a brand new version and didn't have the hardware already, we would say, "Okay, we'll wait until we get the SSDs." But, we sort of earmarked a server. The hardware was on the old EventTracker. So, when we did the upgrade, we knew it was going to be an issue, but we didn't know how big of an issue it was going to be.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I know it's been working well for all the different log sources and stuff that we've been throwing at it. The big thing is we just have it on one big virtualized box. So, we haven't really had any instance or need to scale it beyond that.

I'm mainly the only user. My boss will occasionally use it when I'm out of the office, or something like that, but it's either going to be him or me.

We have it pretty much on all of our servers, firewalls, and routers. The big thing is we have a 500 license count. So, we have a number of different other switches and stuff which would be nice to be able to get logs and stuff from. At the same time, we are getting close to hitting up our 500 license count. Therefore, we're trying to figure out where we need to go as far as what systems are a must-have and what systems are a nice-to-have type of thing.

How are customer service and technical support?

I find EventTracker support to be quite helpful. They have been quite responsive whenever I've had any issues. For the most part, they have been good to work with. There have been a couple times where there have been some issues that have taken a bit of time to try to get resolved and figured out. However, that is sort of par for the course for different products.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Before EventTracker, we did use another solution. I think it was a Symantec SIEM, but they discontinued it. So, we were looking for a different solution. 

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was several years ago, so I don't remember too much about it. The one thing that I do remember is there was like a database account that needed to be created, and there was some back and forth on that aspect. So, it took a little while to set up and get going.

Initially, we got it up and running, then we were going to deploy the agents on some noncritical servers to make sure that the EventTracker agent on the servers worked properly with collecting logs. 

What was our ROI?

In the security space, it's hard to quantify your return on investment. So, I don't. We spend about $40,000 a year and so. It's hard to say if the SIEM saved that much money.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

When we first got the EventTracker product, we were using SIEM Simplified. At the time they didn't call it that, but it was more of a service thing. So, there was a bit more hand-holding and getting stuff set up, along with failure reports, that they did during the first one to two years. Then, we decided that the the additional money to have someone do these daily reports wasn't terribly useful, so we discontinued that service.

Licensing is interesting. By doing it by device, in some aspects, that can work to your advantage, and in some aspects, it can't. 

There are different licensing models. Back in the day, it used to be events per second and trying to figure out the number of events per second during the year that all of your devices are generating. If you didn't necessarily have a solution in place to begin with, this was a little frustrating. You might add another device and all of a sudden your events per second shoot up quite a bit. With a number of system-based licenses, it's been good. The big thing is is when you get up on that license account, do you continue to add additional licenses or start removing some systems that may be not as critical as others? Like, do we need to be getting logs from different Windows test servers out there? Ideally, yes. But it all depends on the pricing.

EventTracker's subscription-based model is interesting as far as yearly license type stuff. It's nice because you know what it's going to be next year. We haven't really looked at any other solutions. The pricing at the time compared to the other solutions was a lot less. A couple of years ago, we actually looked at Splunk. The amount in Splunk's licensing model is based on 20 gigs a day, or something like that. Based on our number of logs and stuff that we were already generating, the costs would be substantially more for the amount of logs that we would be getting.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We looked at a handful of different solutions out there. When we were looking at SIEM solutions out there, we were looking to replace Symantec. We were looking at Arctic Wolf, EiQ Networks, Secureworks, and Trustwave.

The primary reason we went with EventTracker and the SIEM Simplified service was the CIO wanted something that was a 24/7 monitoring type of thing. That's why we went with that service. But, when we found out at the time it really wasn't 24/7, and we wanted 24/7 monitoring from more of a SOC/NOC type of thing. The EventTracker support said, "We do have that." However, that wasn't necessarily the case. It was primarily an eight to five type of thing. Supposedly, in the last couple of years, they have changed it, and it is more of a SOC/NOC type of thing. 

This was one of the reasons: We were looking for a hybrid approach. Basically a SIEM that we could have on-premise where we could have someone else monitor when I was not in the office. EventTracker was able to create the different alerts and stuff like that. So, when I'm not in the office, I get alerts generated. However, we wanted some more active monitoring type stuff.

What other advice do I have?

I would rate the product as a seven (out of 10). 

We don't use the dashboard widgets, but we are planning on it.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
JeffHaidet
Director of Application Development and Architecture at South Central Power Company
Real User
Top 5
SIEMphonic gives us an expert set of eyes on things, and assistance with rules has been a huge time saver

Pros and Cons

  • "I like EventTracker's dashboard. I see it every time I log in because it's the first thing you get to. We have our own widgets that we use. For the sake of transparency, there are a few widgets that we look at there and then we move out from there... Among the particularly helpful widgets, the not-reporting widget is a big one. The number-of-logs-processed is also a good one."
  • "It would be great if they had a client for phones by which they could push a notification to us, as opposed to via email."

What is our primary use case?

It's a system incident and event management platform. The typical use cases that go along with that are alerting and syslog aggregation.

How has it helped my organization?

Their run-and-watch service (now renamed SIEMphonic) has saved from having to hire at least one FTE. In addition, having an expert set of eyes on things and their assistance with rules has been a huge time saver. They've been a really good partner.

We are logging everything from Windows client workstations through our server stack, through important, critical web and cloud pieces, like Office 365 logs and web server logs. The latter would include IIS and Apache. All of that information is being streamed directly into, and assimilated by, the EventTracker product. It seems to be doing the job quite well. Having that visibility into the data is useful. Their interface is simple enough for us to be able to use but advanced enough that if we wanted to do some more advanced queries — which some of their competitors admittedly do a little better out-of-the-box — it hits the wheelhouse perfectly.

We're signed up for their weekly observations, so if they find something big they're going to notify us immediately. But having a management-level synopsis once a week has allowed us to not only replace the one FTE, but also streamline our prioritization of work, based off that data, as well.

What is most valuable?

Other than the log aggregation and alerting, their reports modules have come a long way. But for the most part, we stay right in the wheelhouse of the product to use it to the fullest extent.

The previous version, version 8, had a somewhat antiquated UI. The new version 9 is much easier to use and brings it into the current realm of development. It's very easy, very sleek, and designed relatively well. The version 8 to version 9 upgrade was complete night-and-day. It's significantly improved, and they're putting resources into it to make sure that they continue to stay up to date.

I like EventTracker's dashboard. I see it every time I log in because it's the first thing you get to. We have our own widgets that we use. For the sake of transparency, there are a few widgets that we look at there and then we move out from there. We're into the product looking more at the log information at that point. Among the particularly helpful widgets, the not-reporting widget is a big one. The number-of-logs-processed is also a good one. We call that log volume. They're helpful, but we try to dig in a little deeper, off the dashboard, more often than not.

What needs improvement?

In terms of advanced queries, I wouldn't say EventTracker is lagging behind its peers. The latter just make it easier to get to them. EventTracker is designed more for a small to medium type business, which is where we fit. With a competitive tool like Splunk or LogRhythm, you're not going to get what you get with these guys out-of-the-box. With EventTracker, you're going to have to build all that yourself from scratch. You're going to have to learn that markup language to do so.

I want to stress: We're very happy with not having to deal with that out-of-the-gate. If we need to, we can always call support and they can assist us in writing those more advanced queries. The functionality exists to do advanced queries, they're just not right in your face like they are in a competitive product. But for us, that's what we want.

There's always room for improvement in terms of performance and alerting options. It would be great if they had a client for phones by which they could push a notification to us, as opposed to via email. But those are all things that they'll grow into over time.

For how long have I used the solution?

We've been using EventTracker for just a smidge over three years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It has been extremely stable. Very rarely do we even realize that it's still running, and that's good.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We did have a few concerns with the scalability in the beginning. Our initial concerns were about scaling it and, if we blew it out, were we going to run into performance issues with their agent piece using too many resources on the client or running out of space on the server? But those concerns proved to be unfounded. We have 700 or 800 endpoints streaming data into it without any noticeable performance or any other issues.

We're using it almost to its full extent at this point. We're in that 90 percent range. We currently don't have any plans to move away from it. We're utilizing the features that pertain to us. Anytime that there's a patch or release, we look at the new features to see if they're applicable for us.

How are customer service and technical support?

The EventTracker team itself has been great. We can call them for pretty much anything related to their product. They will offer suggestions, advice, and best practices on ways to do things. It's like having another team member here at our disposal, working with their product. I believe that is their standard tech support.

We're paying for the run-and-watch (SIEMphonic) so we're getting an extra set of eyes on things, but when we call in, their support is top-notch. I would give their support team a 10 out of 10. That is a given. Of all the products and vendors that we've used, I've never had a more positive experience with a support team than with EventTracker's support team.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We did not have a previous solution. We do annual audits, and the lack of a SIEM showed up in one of our audits as a piece that we needed to start investigating, four or five years ago. We knew that issue was coming. We were too busy dealing with some other things, but when it showed up in the audit, we pushed it up the priority food-chain. We weren't really having any issues by not having a SIEM, but having all the logs in one place sure makes troubleshooting a whole lot easier. if there was an Achilles heel, that was it.

We were looking for an easy-to-manage SIEM that provided the functionality that we needed. Since we're a relatively small IT staff, the part that really made EventTracker stand out to us was the run-and-watch service (SIEMphonic), where they are an active partner, reviewing the data that we get, so we don't miss anything. They're acting as a backstop to us.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup was completely painless. They gave us a spec sheet for the on-premise server. We built a VM that matched that spec, and they then installed their software and got it up and running. We could be as involved or as uninvolved as we wanted to be; that was our choice. When it came to deploying the client pieces, they worked with us to identify which machine should get it and when. They took care of the pushing of that information out. When we started getting the data in, and it came time to start tweaking the rules, they took the lead on that as well. It really, truly was a painless process.

The deployment took less than a week. We had an analyst at that time who was running point on it. I wasn't even involved. I didn't need to be involved in it at that level. One of our entry-level analysts was able to work with them to get everything caught up.

I and one analyst are involved in the day-to-day maintenance of the application. Our entire IT staff, nine people, uses it for log review and incident correlation. We try to put the information out there for the rest of our team members to use.

What was our ROI?

We have been able to save at least one full FTE. The amount we would have to pay that FTE, including benefits, is way more than what we're paying EventTracker for the annual maintenance. It had a positive return on investment almost immediately for us.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Our cost is significantly less than what it would have been for one of the competitor's products, and that includes the run-and-watch service (SIEMphonic). You can go with one-, two-, or three-year agreements. We pay annually for maintenance on the product.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

When we acquired EventTracker, we went through an assessment process, reviewing five or six different manufacturers of SIEMs. The frontrunners were the typical players: Splunk and LogRhythm. There were a couple of freeware options out there, but what really set EventTracker apart was their SIEMphonic. That was the big differentiator. We were able to get much more value for our money, and it met all the requirements that we had set out when we started the research.

There weren't really major differences between EventTracker and the other players. Ultimately, SIEMs do the same things. They collect logs, they index those logs, and they make them searchable. There's not really a difference on the surface.

What other advice do I have?

The biggest lesson really isn't an EventTracker lesson, it's more of a SIEM lesson. And that lesson is: It's a lot of data. When you have a lot of data, it's going to take a while to study and learn that data, so you can react appropriately. Not all data is actionable.

Be prepared for the data. Be prepared to know what you didn't know before. And be prepared to weed out the noise from the actual data. That's where EventTracker's SIEMphonic becomes very helpful. My advice would be, if you're going to go with EventTracker, to go with the SIEMphonic service and leverage their support team to get your knowledge up to speed. So far, our experience with their support has been top-notch.

In terms of how we view EventTracker, we're typically just in a browser, so it's on whatever our standard is. I've got a couple of 20-inch monitors on my desk. It's sleek enough that it will work on a normal 15-inch laptop screen too. I have not looked at it on mobile yet, given the fact that it's an on-premise service. If I'm in the building, getting VPN'ed in across my phone is a little tough. But that would be the next iteration of the product, if we would decide to push up towards the cloud instead of being on-prem. We would definitely be looking for some sort of a mobile or a tablet-based mobile interface.

We have not integrated EventTracker with other products. Our service-desk tool is a tool called Samanage, which was recently acquired by SolarWinds and has been renamed Solar Winds Service Desk. We have not integrated anything with that since SolarWinds acquired it, because we wanted to see what SolarWinds was going to do with it. Integrating it into EventTracker is on the list. We'll do it if it makes sense.

I never rate anything a 10 out of 10, because nothing is ever perfect. But this solution would be at the upper end of that range. This partnership with EventTracker has been one of our better ones.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
Mark Lauteren
Chief Information Officer at ECRMC
Real User
Top 5
Gives us a good quality view of what's going on in our environment

Pros and Cons

  • "There are a host of things that are most valuable. Obviously monitoring our environment and reporting out different events is important. They perform a suite of services. They monitor all of our servers, all of our key infrastructure, like our DNS, our switches, all that stuff. They aggregate and correlate that quarterly. They'll tell us if we're getting a lot of login failures and something is going on or if something's weird."
  • "Communication is always something that can be improved, but I feel that any time we've had a communication issue, it's quickly addressed when we bring those up at the monthly meetings. Usually, it's an individual that wasn't clear in the communication, it's not the process per se. You always have to be able to segregate if the process didn't work or an individual either didn't say the right thing or my people didn't understand what they were being told."

What is our primary use case?

EventTracker analyzes all of the different types of security events, it both aggregates and correlates. They send us a daily report of things like servers that aren't responding that normally respond and any kind of events that they see from the day before. If there is a serious perceived security event, they will call. I have two folks at InfoSec, so they will call directly and say, "Hey, we're seeing something here." Then between the two of them, they'll try and identify whether it is a true event or not, and then monthly, we sit down with them on a call where we talk about what's going on and if there are opportunities for improvement.

If there was an event that we felt they shouldn't have escalated to us then we'll let them know and we'll talk about how it could have been avoided or vice versa or if there was an event that we didn't get escalated but it should have been. We don't get a lot of those, mostly it's about, "Hey, we're adding this new device, we want to make sure it's on the list, so it's getting monitored", and things like that.

How has it helped my organization?

EventTracker enables us to keep on top of our work. We're a hospital, so we're 24/7. We don't have enough staff to do that, so they're able to monitor things off-hours, and then even during hours I get two people from InfoSec. They can't be sitting there staring at a screen all the time, they have to go out and do other things and attend meetings, etc. and so they're able to rely on the tool to correlate and then notify them either via pager or phone call if something comes up that is deemed to be important enough to be notified. That's huge for us because we don't have the budget from a staffing standpoint to have people on-site 24/7.

Back in the day, I used to work for Intel and we had a whole room full of people who just sat there and stared at the screen for events. It was in their data center group. We don't have that kind of staff. The only people half staring at a screen all day long are the call center, and they're the ones who take tickets and talk to end-users but they don't have the time to sit there and monitor the event logs and all of the other things. That's the value the tool gives us. I can have people doing real work and then things that need to be escalated are escalated. It saves us roughly two full-time employees. It cuts my team in half. 

EventTracker also helps us with compliance mandates. The tool helps us document that we're following best practice, that we're identifying issues and tracking them, and that we have logs of what issues were identified. That allows us to be able to show a lot of the documentation that we are really doing best practice. I just don't physically have enough team members to do that. This allows me to be able to provide that 24/7.

It's not just a tool, it's a service. The secret sauce is not the tool. I could buy a tool from a dozen vendors. I have a tool to be able to aggregate and correlate all of these events and send something to a screen. But if I still have to have somebody sitting there staring at a screen all day long, that's valuable but not as valuable as someone that has a team, that is an essential SOC, that is aware of what's going on in the world and is saying "I'm seeing this in seven places, including El Centro, let's get ahold of El Centro so they can start taking action on it."

There's nobody that's dedicated to internal incident management. I have two information security folks and they do everything from internal incident management to designing new implementations, to reviews of existing annual information, and security audits. They do all of that, but they don't sit there all day long, staring at a screen, looking at incidents, and trying to figure out what to do. That's the value that we get out of it. That's the extra value.

What is most valuable?

Monitoring our environment and reporting out different events is important. They perform a suite of services. They monitor all of our servers, all of our key infrastructure, like our DNS, our switches, all that stuff. They aggregate and correlate that quarterly. They'll tell us if we're getting a lot of login failures and something is going on or if something's weird.

I like the dashboard. Our security folks look at it all the time. They have it running, they have a big screen monitor in one of their offices and it's up all the time.

I don't use the UI very much but from what I've been told by the security team, it's very easy to use. Compared to other products, the team found it pretty easy to use. We've got the dashboards published on a large screen TV so they can look at it all the time, and then they typically have it on their desk. It is also available on smartphones.

We import log data into EventTracker. It feeds the overall picture of giving us a good quality view of what's going on in our environment.

What needs improvement?

Communication is always something that can be improved, but I feel that any time we've had a communication issue, it's quickly addressed when we bring those up at the monthly meetings. Usually, it's an individual that wasn't clear in the communication, it's not the process per se. You always have to be able to segregate if the process didn't work or an individual either didn't say the right thing or my people didn't understand what they were being told. So far, I have not understood or heard of any issues that were more process or tool-related, it's individual-related. 

The industry is changing. The landscape is changing all the time and they seem to do a pretty good job of keeping up with that. That's a challenge in information security. That's a target that doesn't just move. It moves from room to room, to room, not just a few inches, one way or the other. You're constantly changing. You're chasing a moving target that's really moving. It boils it down to here's what we think is going on versus our people. If all they did was keep track of what was going on in the industry, that's all they'd do because I only have two people.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using EventTracker since I have been at my company for the past year but it's been at my company for several years. 

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

It is as stable as a rock. I have not heard of a single outage on it.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We haven't scaled it out to anything other than what we had. They've done a pretty good job of implementing it. Since I've been here, we've had a virtual server primarily here and there, but we have not done a lot of scaling out. There hasn't been a discussion about what limitations there would be.

It monitors all of our infrastructure, all of our servers. It's being very extensively used. As we grow those, we're getting ready to open a new building early next year, all of the equipment that goes into that building will be added to it.

We fully implemented it so I don't know that there's a lot other than organic growth that would need to be done.

How are customer service and technical support?

My InfoSec team talks to support occasionally. There have been a few cases where they saw something they didn't quite understand, so they would call and ask for information, but it's been few and far between. I have not heard of any issues with support. I heard that their experience with them has been good. 

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

At a previous company, we used a different tool. It was a much more encompassing tool that does a bunch of different event monitoring, correlation, and aggregation. It was a management suite that did things like backups as well. I know when we implemented it at Intel, it was atrocious. The problem was the process. We had tens of thousands of servers and we implemented the tool and we turned everything on. Events scrolled by the screen so fast, you couldn't even see them. We had to say, "Well, wait a minute. Let's dial this back a little bit." They also didn't do a good job of aggregating or correlating. 

The main difference between that tool and EventTracker is the ease of use. That tool was all CLI based. Everything was command-line based. The syntax that you had to use with that CLI was very challenging and very specific. If you thought you were doing the right thing but something did work and it wouldn't warn you that you didn't do it right.

How was the initial setup?

I have not been told that there were any issues when it was implemented. We have not done any major upgrades since I've been here. We've done incremental patch-type things but I don't know of any issues.

I did hear it was relatively labor-intensive, but that's because of all of the processes around the communication, like what gets communicated and what doesn't. That's to be expected anytime you're doing a lot of workflow work, that takes time.

There's daily maintenance in that they're responding to events or they're working on the tool. There is very little done as far as trying to make changes to the tool itself. Our information security team does respond to events. It's a chunk of their time. We don't have to spend a lot of time at all tweaking the tool. I wouldn't say we spend even an hour a day.

I have two people in InfoSc and a couple of people in my network team that reviews it. My help desk people will review it but they don't really use it per se. They'll see events and that's it. Most of the time that really goes to the information security team.

What was our ROI?

Our ROI is $160,000 a year before overhead, then adding in the overhead of 30 to 40% with benefits and everything else, it's easily over $200,000 a year.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

They've been very fair. I think that we've had to push back a little bit here and there on pricing. 

What other advice do I have?

The biggest lesson I have learned is that the outsourcing of this service has a dramatic impact on the organization. We can't just keep throwing bodies at it internally, we have to leverage somebody else's knowledge.

Some people don't trust outsourcing. I'm not a big outsourcing guy. But I really don't treat them as an outsource, I treat them more as a partner. You're going to have to do this one way or the other, or are you going to get nailed at some point. That's just the way it is. If you're not following these things, you're going to get nailed. If you trust them and you realize that they're doing things that you should be doing or are doing, you're going to save a lot of money out. It's going to be cost-effective for you. It won't just save money, it will be cost-effective.

I would rate EventTracker a ten out of ten. 

Having dealt with a lot of vendors and their sales, they are probably one of the more low-keyed. They're not out there constantly trying to sell me stuff. I don't know if it's because we have everything so there's nothing left to sell or not, but they've been very easy to deal with. Their leadership and their sales organization have been very easy to deal with.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: IT Central Station contacted the reviewer to collect the review and to validate authenticity. The reviewer was referred by the vendor, but the review is not subject to editing or approval by the vendor.
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