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Avijit Barai
Automation Tester at a tech services company with 201-500 employees
Real User
Top 20
Helps us navigate through applications effortlessly
Pros and Cons
  • "For me, the most valuable feature of Selenium lies in its ability to help us find elements quickly. Apart from that, the driver interface is really useful, too. When we implement the Selenium driver interface, we can easily navigate through all of the pages and sections of an app, including performing things like clicking, putting through SendKeys, scrolling down, tagging, and all the other actions we need to test for in an application."
  • "One drawback to Selenium is that there is nothing like an object repository, such as that found in QTP, especially considering continuous integration practices that have become common nowadays."

What is our primary use case?

Currently I am doing mobile application automation with Appium and Selenium, as well as front-end application automation with tools like WAVE for mobile and desktop applications. The only area that I'm not involved in at present is API testing, though I am hoping there will be opportunities to get to that as well in the future.

We typically use Selenium and Appium in automation and testing by first identifying which modules we are able to automate. Then, whenever we encounter some new course in the framework that we're using, and we need to use a hybrid kind of framework, we will use Selenium to resolve it. 

How has it helped my organization?

Selenium has improved the way we work because if you do what we need to do manually, you'll have to expend a lot of time. For example, it would be a huge chore to navigate through an application manually every day, and particularly if there's a new build on the way, you would have to check all the regulations over again by hand. That would simply take too much time, and so what Selenium does for us is that in one resource it can handle the work of three, four resources, provided that the scripts are straightforward and coded properly. That's the main cool thing about Selenium, I would say.

What is most valuable?

For me, the most valuable feature of Selenium lies in its ability to help us find elements quickly. Apart from that, the driver interface is really useful, too. When we implement the Selenium driver interface, we can easily navigate through all of the pages and sections of an app, including performing things like clicking, putting through SendKeys, scrolling down, tagging, and all the other actions we need to test for in an application.

What needs improvement?

One drawback to Selenium is that there is nothing like an object repository, such as that found in QTP, especially considering continuous integration practices that have become common nowadays. In future, if they can provide an object repository or some kind of repository for data, then that I would greatly appreciate it. For example, once you have the app credentials and all the other security data and you don't want to show them to other people who are not authorized, a repository for this kind of data would be very useful. You could then simply grant access to only those people who need it.

Another improvement I can think of is in the area of documentation and support. With Selenium, we're using freeware software, and because of this there is no support or anything from the vendor. In this case, you have to rely solely on your own coding experience and exposure to the tool, and you often have to search through many pages of code when you want to change something in your implementation. It also makes you rely on your problem-solving skills to a large degree, because some problems are not that easy to solve by yourself.

If I can compare Selenium with another solution such as SoapUI Pro, there's a big difference when it comes to coding your own solutions. With SoapUI Pro, if you want to fetch some data, you don't need to write any code or anything, and for someone with no coding experience, this makes it much easier to be able to use effectively. So, ultimately, more support for non-technical people would make for a great improvement in Selenium.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using Selenium HQ for the last two to three years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

The stability of Selenium depends on the skill level of the team that is using it. If you are writing solid code for automating your scripts, then you will find that Selenium itself is a stable solution. But if you're writing sloppy code then you may find that Selenium slows down or becomes unstable. Truly, I think it all depends on the people who are using it, and how they approach the architecture of the framework.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

I am hopeful that Selenium will scale well because, along with others nowadays, we plan to to move into cloud-based provisioning with continuous integration. We will be doing that with AWS, most likely.

How are customer service and support?

I haven't taken any technical support till now because Selenium is freeware, and you will not be getting any technical support directly. So that could be something that they could work on because if they were able to provide support, it would great for us and many others. Without it, you can still add code to the Selenium software itself, but they won't be able to help you with it.

On the other hand, I do believe there is enough documentation online for anyone who wants to figure it out by themselves. There are videos, tutorials, and other resources available to us.

How was the initial setup?

The setup of Selenium is easy, in my experience, since it is provided as JAR files that you can download. Apart from that, there is, I believe, an architectural approach where you can simply input your dependencies and it will automatically download all the JAR files needed, and other required files.

As for deploying the code, this is just as easy. For example, if you're working with some type of continuous integration, it's a breeze to deploy. First, you have to build up your framework, and then you can deploy it to Git, or GitHub, or anywhere you want. At this point it's just about uploading the code, so there's not much to it. 

What about the implementation team?

I am currently implementing Selenium along with a few other tools. For example, for mobile device automation, I'm using Selenium with Appium. The Selenium architecture can be integrated with Appium in order to be able to automate with mobile devices such as Android and iOS, which is what I'm doing now. Beyond that, we also have desktop applications; for Windows we have EXE files and for Mac we have DMG files. With these, I have implemented the Windows application drivers using Selenium so that we're able to easily automate any Windows-based or Mac-based app.

As for the rest of the team who are implementing Selenium this way, we have about 15 people on the testing side of things, and 6 people in automation.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

Selenium is free software so we do not pay licensing costs. 

What other advice do I have?

My advice to others is that, first of all, you have to understand the process of automation from a general point of view, and how people get on with the coding and all that. If you only have manual experience, like a lot of new testers, then you likely don't have much experience in coding either. And in that case, my advice would be to first understand the logic of the process. For instance, before jumping into it from the deep end, try get a handle on a few small steps first, and as you go along you will learn the basic coding, the basic architecture, how Selenium works, how the automation process works, and so on.

Then, take a piece of code and ensure that it works as a standalone script, then finally jump into the framework. Develop from any framework, use it as best as possible, get some experience with it, and try to become an expert from there.

You can use any programming language you prefer. As for myself, I'm using Java, but you can use C#, Python, Ruby, PHP, etc. There's a lot of support for different programming languages with Selenium. 

My biggest lessons while using Selenium have had to do with automation and how it really works, which is something I've always been interested in. Once I get an application, any application whether it be a WAVE app or mobile app, I very much enjoy getting stuck into the automation part of testing. And what I've learned is that not everything is that easy to automate.

In many cases, I have had to team up with new solutions and play around with code on my own, which has been a great learning experience for me. Apart from that, with Selenium I have been able to implement new things such as OCR (Optical Character Recognition) which is useful when you are not able to find all the elements you need, and I feel good that I was personally able to enhance the automation process with what I have learned along the way.

I would rate Selenium HQ an eight out of ten. 

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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Technical Test Lead at a tech services company with 10,001+ employees
Real User
Easy to use with strong reporting features
Pros and Cons
  • "With Postman you can do automation. Automation has increased efficiency by more than 30% or 40%. Because the speed has increased, it's also possible for us to do in-sprint automation testing."
  • "To get this email reporting function, we have to integrate Postman with Newman. If the two are not integrated, we won't be getting all these things in one group."

What is our primary use case?

We're a big organization. I'm not sure how many employees we have, but everyone on our team uses Postman. We use Postman mostly to do API testing for a U.S.-based telecom company. I work in a middleware layer, so we get a lot of events from some other subsystems. Events are sent to a particular pipeline comprising Rabbit MQ and Kafka. It's not possible for our organization to simulate the events, like in a QA environment. It's not easy to create those events because they are sent by other companies or other systems.

Using Postman, we simulate these events by sending the events to that particular pipeline. Then we have a consumer application attached to that pipeline. When this particular event is triggered, it's captured and sent to Kafka, so we get a response in a system. It's basically a simulation. Some people try this in our organization itself. For my part, it's more on the DB side. 

How has it helped my organization?

Before integrating Postman, we were triggering events manually. With Postman you can do automation. Automation has increased efficiency by more than 30% or 40%. Because the speed has increased, it's also possible for us to do in-sprint automation testing. When we do manual test cases, we can add an automated test case in the same script. This makes it easy for us to do in-sprint automation. The client is also happy because each time they ask for something, we can provide that.

What is most valuable?

The most valuable aspect of Postman is its ease of use. If a new client comes to our organization, it is very easy to ask him or her to install Postman, then get the URL, and then provide them with the fields for mandate refills or whatever field is applicable. We can ask them to get the JSON. We can even create validations and assertions. Postman can also be integrated with another tool called Newman. 

Postman also has strong reporting features that allow us to create reports and then send these to the stakeholders. We use regularly scheduled reports. Every day at 10:00 a.m. our time, a report will be generated and sent to the stakeholders. We do a regression daily, and everybody gets the report also. It's a very user-friendly tool. Anybody can learn it. In my case, what I do is create an input Excel sheet when I give all the values. It takes the values from the Excel sheet. In the pipeline, we have something called YAML script Baron.

The automation tool requires a little work. You have to spend some time initially, but after that, you don't have to worry about it. For a given set of test cases, I create automated test cases and then add them to this particular regression suite, so that everything will run. If somebody asks me to run a regression tool, I can easily show them the results. It's all in the report, and they can click on it to see the input value that I've given. 

What needs improvement?

To get this email reporting function, we have to integrate Postman with Newman. If the two are not integrated, we won't be getting all these things in one group. I'm not sure if the open-source version of Postman has that. I need to check. If it doesn't, then that's something Postman could add as a native feature.

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using Postman for three years.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Postman has never failed. Maybe once or twice depending on my internet connection. But generally, no issues from the Postman site.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

We have integrated Postman with Newman, and that is working fine.

How are customer service and technical support?

I've never had to call Postman support actually. If you want to integrate something, you can turn to community forums and online sources. When we were trying to integrate Postman and Newman, we could just Google it. We didn't have to call anyone. 

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

We've used other solutions in parallel with Postman, like ADAPT Test. ADAPT is more of a service virtualization tool, but we can also do API testing in that particular tool. We were finding it difficult because it taking time for us to open the tool. Frequently, we were getting some error messages. On the other hand, we had support. It's a good tool, but it was not that stable. Eventually, we decided that we would just stick with Postman.

How was the initial setup?

Postman setup was straightforward. It was not complex

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

It's open-source, so I don't think a cost is involved.

What other advice do I have?

If you're getting started with API testing, Postman is the first tool I would suggest for anybody who wants to learn API. It's easy. Later on, you can try SoapUI and finally move on to ADAPT Test. It's easy to teach and train others to use Postman. I can share my screen and tell them. It's not like I have to sit with them, then show them. There's nothing like that. It's very easy. Even a recommendation will do. When I'm teaching a person, I don't have to sit with them and tell them, "Click there. Click that." I can create a document and share it with them and they can do it on their own. 

I would rate Postman eight out of 10. I need to check on the email functionality though. If email is provided, I might rate it 10. I'm not sure.

Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
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ITCS user
Software QA Test Engineer at a tech services company with 51-200 employees
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
Good reporting as well as integration with Jenkins and Slack, but it crashes often
Pros and Cons
  • "The most important feature is the Jenkins integration; it is pretty straight forward and allows us to run nightly builds."
  • "It would be helpful to have an automatic save feature."

What is our primary use case?

We evaluated Katalon Studio along with Postman and SoapUI to be part of our testing framework. We used it mainly for microservices, API automation, and testing API endpoints. We click one button to have it run all of the tests and generate a report.

How has it helped my organization?

Katalon Studio is useful because it helped us to generate reports to see which test cases passed versus which ones failed. It gives a good graphical representation of the results.

What is most valuable?

The most important feature is the Jenkins integration; it is pretty straight forward and allows us to run nightly builds.

The integration with Slack is very helpful.

The Katalon Analytical Studio, which is directly integrated, offers better reporting capabilities, which is a good feature.

What needs improvement?

We found that Katalon Studio crashes a lot of the time and it would be very good if it were more stable. When it crashes, the tests are not always saved and this means that you have to start again from scratch. It would be helpful to have an automatic save feature.

For how long have I used the solution?

We used Katalon Studio for about two months while we were evaluating different products.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

This solution crashes often and stability is something that needs improvement.

I would rate the stability a six and a half out of ten.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

Scalability depends on the scope of the project. It is not meant for load testing. However, if it can be integrated then you would see that it's more scalable in that aspect. Because it is just for API endpoint testing, it is not as scalable as one would assume. Again, it is for endpoint testing as opposed to load testing.

We had a team of four or five people who were using this product. They are test engineers with similar roles. 

How are customer service and technical support?

It is a growing community. There are documents available but I would say that the community is pretty small as compared to what Postman has.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

Prior to this solution, we were using TestNG. It is more about writing automation code as opposed to using an automation tool. Using it means that you have to write a lot of code. Code snippets will do for some testing but if you want to do regression testing then there is a lot more to do. One of the reasons that we implemented Postman, and evaluated Katalon Studio, was to get away from writing code and using something more stable.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is quite straightforward.

We deploy per release, where every two weeks we deploy a new release.

Our implementation strategy is to create the test case first, then to create a test suite in the object repository. We can add all of the endpoints, and the calls for the endpoints. We run the tests through the suites, which will test all of the test cases. It is then run with the Jenkins integration and Slack integration to get the results, and what has passed or failed will be clear.

What about the implementation team?

The implementation is straightforward if you are using it from the local machine. You can download it directly through the provider interface.

If you are running it through the Jenkins you will require a plugin to be downloaded. Jenkins supports plugins that include the Katalon plugin, and once downloaded, you enter your code into the repository and run it from there.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

We were using the free version of this tool.

Which other solutions did I evaluate?

We evaluated Postman and SoapUI along with Katalon Studio. Ultimately, we chose Postman because it has been in the market for a while, it has good open-source documentation and has a more active community. In general, people trust it.

What other advice do I have?

Products such as this one are a byproduct of artificial intelligence. It comes up with very nice code snippets that we can use, and it is good to see the industry moving forward in this aspect. The future is AI and Katalon is a part of that.

When it comes to testing RESTful APIs, this is a good solution but in the alternative, Postman is out there. That is the one that we ultimately chose to implement.

I would rate this solution a seven out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Hybrid Cloud

If public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud, which cloud provider do you use?

Amazon Web Services (AWS)
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Vallalarasu  Pandiyan
Test Architect at a tech services company with 1,001-5,000 employees
Real User
Top 5Leaderboard
A great single platform for functional testing, load testing security, and service actualization
Pros and Cons
  • "A single platform for functional testing, load testing security, and service actualization."
  • "Lacking flexibility of adding more custom verification for security testing."

What is our primary use case?

We are partners with SmartBear and I'm a test architect.

What is most valuable?

ReadyAPI is one of the best tools for API testing because they have made a single platform for functional testing, load testing security, and also service actualization. We also have virtual work that can be an add-in within ReadyAPI. For integration for CACD, they have something called TestEngine, which can also be an add-on for ReadyAPI. We use Python request library and things like that but if you're a bigger organization with hundreds of APIs, then ReadyAPI is a one-stop solution for complete API testing. If you consider TestComplete and other products for an equivalent outcome, you might get something nearly comparable, butReadyAPI is the outstanding product.

What needs improvement?

I think the security testing with API could be improved as they provide limited templates. It would be helpful if they provided us with more capabilities and the flexibility of adding more custom verification for the security testing part of ReadyAPI. Basically, some additional features would improve the product. 

For how long have I used the solution?

I've been using this solution for five years. 

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

If you are thinking about huge numbers of APIs that need to be maintained and executed, this product can be scalable to large amounts. We can create multiple projects, maintain them and group them according to what suits our test skills. All this comes with a beautified structure from whatever SoapUI open source we have. They carry all the advantages of open source and additionally they are non-scripting and generate reports after test events. All these things as well as custom reporting if you need that, so it's very comfortable for scaling.

We need to use ReadyAPI for scalability, because if you go to RestAssured and are writing a framework there, it is good for a hundred APIs. But if you go for a thousand APIs you'll need to have someone to maintain the code completely and to fix it whenever it's failing. You need to rewrite the frameworks and then if your API is getting updated you need to modify all this stuff, but here the API is so good.

How are customer service and technical support?

Technical support is very good. If you have a customer ID and you purchase the license, I think you will get a response from SmartBear within 24 hours. They also give a platform for requesting new features. They have a large technical team who analyze and try to implement, and they give you the status of your suggestions, so they will tell you that they're still in the process of analyzing whether they will accept them or not. Their community, the SmartBear community, is huge and very well organized actually. If you have any technical questions, even if you don't raise a support ticket but raise a question in the community, they have multiple community managers for specific products. They'll either answer or tag someone to answer any question. 

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I previously worked with SoapUI Open Source, and also with ParaSoft SOAtest which is a similar product to ReadyAPI from the ParaSoft SOAtest. That is also a very good API testing tool and I think they recently added smart generator features and other things. I think that perhaps their ID is not very compatible and not as user friendly as ReadyAPI, but it also has very good features.

How was the initial setup?

The initial setup is pretty straightforward, it's just an exe. And then when we execute it, the UI pops up and we can use it. Recently I think they've added a lot of integrations and other new releases. Implementation takes a couple of minutes and we're up and running. 

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

When it comes to large enterprise, ReadyAPI is good. They also sell specific additional products but they don't force you to buy the complete package. You can select and purchase whichever products you want. The price is reasonable and I don't think it's very high, because of the flexibility - anyone can buy any product at any time.

What other advice do I have?

If you're testing mainly on API and then you want to have a full-fledged API testing on load performance, function, security, etc., this product will actually be a one-stop platform for that.

I would rate this solution an eight out of 10. 

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

On-premises
Disclosure: My company has a business relationship with this vendor other than being a customer: partner
CEO at a tech vendor with 11-50 employees
Real User
Top 5
Incredibly scalable with good technical support that is responsive
Pros and Cons
  • "The most valuable features are scalability and technical support."
  • "Better functionality for validating inputs and outputs would be helpful."

What is our primary use case?

We are using Apigee as our API gateway.

What is most valuable?

The most valuable features are scalability and technical support.

What needs improvement?

The definition of the APIs should improve because you can't easily validate the inputs and outputs. Better functionality for validating inputs and outputs would be helpful.

For how long have I used the solution?

I have been using Apigee for four years.

We are working with a SaaS model and we install the on-premises model version also.

What do I think about the stability of the solution?

Apigee is a very stable product.

What do I think about the scalability of the solution?

The scalability is incredible. We make an average of 22 million API calls.

We have less than ten people who are developers.

We have plans to increase usage in the future.

How are customer service and technical support?

The technical support is very good and we are satisfied with it. They respond very quickly and I like it.

Which solution did I use previously and why did I switch?

I have used several solutions previously, such as IBM API Connect, WSO2 API Manager, and many other API solutions.

What's my experience with pricing, setup cost, and licensing?

It is not suited for small companies. It's expensive.

For a bank, it would not be expensive, but to implement this solution for a smaller company such as an insurance company, it would be too expensive.

The pricing is complicated and not flexible.

The older versions are more suited for small to medium-sized companies. You can no longer pay €20,000 per year.

What other advice do I have?

This is a very good API tool.

I think that this solution is very good in some use cases but not very good for some small companies. It can be complicated for licensing and pricing. This is a product that I can recommend otherwise.

I would rate this solution an eight out of ten.

Which deployment model are you using for this solution?

Hybrid Cloud
Disclosure: I am a real user, and this review is based on my own experience and opinions.
Get our free report covering SmartBear, Postman, Parasoft, and other competitors of SoapUI Pro. Updated: January 2022.
563,208 professionals have used our research since 2012.